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Design, Rhythm & Geometry in Abstraction Panel Discussion

Douglas Melini, Returning to the Sky, 2016, Acrylic on canvas with hand painted frame, 25 3/8 x 21 3/8 x 1 3/4 inches

Design, Rhythm & Geometry in Abstraction: A Panel Discussion
Moderated by Matthew Deleget
With presentations by John Crawford, Christopher French, Douglas Melini & Melissa Meyer
Dorksy Gallery Curatorial Programs
11-03 45th Avenue
Long Island City, NY 11101
www.dorsky.org
Sunday, November 13, 3:00–4:30pm
Seating will be limited: RSVP 718-937-6317 or rsvp@dorsky.org

In conjunction with our current exhibition, Confluence/Influence: Mingei in Contemporary Abstraction curated by Bridget Donlon, Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs is pleased to present:

Design, Rhythm & Geometry in Abstraction
A Panel Discussion moderated by Matthew Deleget with presentations by John Crawford, Christopher French, Douglas Melini & Melissa Meyer

Among the foundational principles of Mingei, a Japanese folk art movement started in the 1920’s, is the adherence to simple, straightforward design concepts. The artists on this panel all employ specific design structures in their work that vary from geometric to rhythmically lyrical. The panelists will discuss their own works in the show with regards to design and how the concepts behind Mingei play a role in their thinking.

Matthew Deleget is an artist, curator, and arts worker. Matthew has exhibited his work nationally and internationally, including solo and group exhibitions in the US, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. His work was included in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. Additional museum exhibitions include MoMA/P.S.1 (Long Island City, NY); Bronx Museum of the Arts (Bronx, NY); Herbert F. Johnson Museum (Ithaca, NY); Bass Museum of Art (Miami, FL); and Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art (Indianapolis, IN). In 2003, Matthew co-founded MINUS SPACE (www.minusspace.com), a gallery based in Brooklyn, NY, specializing in contemporary reductive abstract art, and represents pioneering emerging and established artists and estates from the United States, Europe, South America, and Australasia. He holds an MFA in Painting and an MS in Theory, Criticism and History of Art, Design and Architecture from Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY. He holds a BA in Art and German from Wabash College, Crawfordsville, IN. He is a member of American Abstract Artists, the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation’s Artist Advisory Committee, and the board of The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts. Matthew lives with his wife, artist Rossana Martinez and son Mateo in Brooklyn, NY.

John Crawford (b. 1953, New York) received his BFA from RISD in 1975. He moved to Tuscany, Italy in 1976, where he apprenticed at a 17th century blacksmith shop until 1986, exchanging labor for use of the forge to make sculpture, and for training to make traditional farm tools. The unpretentious beauty of the shovels, hoes, and axes he learned to make became one of the most important underpinnings for his work from that time to the present. Crawford returned to NYC in 1986 and built a studio where he continues to work with metal using forging and machining processes. Exhibitions include solo shows at the Queens College Art Center, NY and the Sculpture Center, NY. Crawford has also been commissioned to create public works for Amherst College, MA and Queens College, NY. Honors include a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Grant (1977). The artist lives and works in Brooklyn, NY and is represented by Lori Bookstein Fine Art, New York.

Christopher French (b. 1957, St. Louis) grew up in Sacramento, receiving his BA from the University of California, Davis. After graduation he focused on performance, joining the Royal Lichtenstein 1⁄4 Ring Circus for a yearlong tour. Resettling in Oakland, he returned to painting, working in a representational style. French’s approach to painting changed when, after moving to New York, he found a book of Braille paper on the street. “At first only the vigorous textures of the paper caught my eye, but I quickly became fascinated with the textual as well as the textural potential of my materials.” For more than a decade he used Braille paper to create abstractions that simultaneously connote harmony and contradiction by balancing the immediacy of sight with the tactility of touch. More recently, his paintings construct intricate compositions based on the diverse beauty of natural patterns and systems. French’s work has been widely exhibited nationally and abroad. Museum collections include the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Hirshhorn Museum of Art, National Museum of American Art, and Weatherspoon Museum. French has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Joan Mitchell Foundation, and Cultural Arts Council of Houston and Harris County. In 1996 he spent 6 months working in Paris on a Cité Internationale des Arts Residency. French is also an art critic, curator, and teacher. His criticism and social commentary has appeared in The Brooklyn Rail, ART- news, Flash Art, Art Papers, The Journal of Art, and other publications. He has authored or contributed essays to numerous monographs and exhibition catalogues, and is a past president of the United States chapter of the International Association of Art Critics (AICA). He currently lives and works in Long Island, New York.

Douglas Melini (b. 1972) was educated at CalArts (MFA), Santa Clarita, CA and University of Maryland, College Park, MD; he currently lives and works in both Brooklyn and New Jersey. Melini’s previous solo exhibitions include 11R Gallery, NY, Feature Inc., NY; The Suburban, Oak Park, IL; Minus Space, Brooklyn, NY; Richard Heller Gallery, Santa Monica, CA; and a White Room at White Columns, NY. Douglas Melini is represented by 11R gallery in NYC.

Melissa Meyer’s development has been surveyed in two traveling exhibitions—one originated at the New York Studio School and the second at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania. Her works have been included recently in group exhibitions at The Jewish Museum, New York; Texas Gallery, Houston; Montclair Art Museum, New Jersey; The Hyde Collection, Glens Falls, New York; the Fiterman Art Center at the Borough of Manhattan Community College, and the National Academy of Design in New York, an organization of which she is a member. She has completed public commissions in New York, Tokyo, Shanghai and Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. Her work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Brooklyn Museum, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, The Jewish Museum, the McNay Art Museum and many other public and private collections across the United States. Meyer was awarded a Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome and has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Pollock Krasner Foundation. She is a frequent artist in residence at Yaddo in Saratoga Springs, New York, and worked at the MacDowell Colony for the first time in 2012. A dialogue between Meyer and art historian Stephanie Buhmann is included in a new book of interviews with contemporary women artists, New York Studio Conversations, published by The Greenbox. August 2016 she was in residence at the Bau Institute of Camargo, France. She is represented in New York by the Lennon Weinberg gallery.

Image:
Douglas Melini
Returning to the Sky, 2016
Acrylic on canvas with hand painted frame
25 3/8 x 21 3/8 x 1 3/4 inches

posted October 05, 2016 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Artist Dialogue with Paul Sunday

Paul Sunday & Matthew Deleget, Artist Dialogue, New York Public Library, December 3, 2016

Paul Sunday & Matthew Deleget: Artist Dialogue
New York Public Library
Mid-Manhattan Library
455 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016
www.nypl.org
Saturday, December 3, 2016
Corner Room 2:30-4:30pm

A conversation with artist Paul Sunday regarding his solo exhibition “Archive/Improv: New Photographs”, curated by Arezoo Moseni at the library from September 2016 to February 2017.

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Russell Maltz & Some American Friends

Matthew Deleget, Shadowplay 4, Vanitas Series, 2016, Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame, 11.25 x 9.25 x 1.5 inches

Russell Maltz & Some American Friends
Schauraum Multipleart
Merkurstrasse 44
8032 Zurich, Switzerland
www.multipleart.net
August 25 – October 6, 2016

New work and multiples by Russell Maltz, Kevin Clarke, Matthew Deleget, Cris Gianakos, Michelle Grabner, and müller-emil.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Shadowplay 4, Vanitas Series, 2016
Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame
11.25 x 9.25 x 1.5 inches

posted August 25, 2016 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , ,

The Black & White Project

Matthew Deleget, Black and White Project, Transmitter, Brooklyn, NY

The Black & White Project
Curated by Yifat Gat for Look & Listen
Transmitter
1329 Willoughby Avenue, 2A
Brooklyn, NY 11237
www.transmitter.nyc
August 12 – September 11, 2016

“The very nature of working in The Black & White Project lends a sense of unity, which facilitates the assemblage of works from a broad range. Illustrative, grid-­based, drawing, embroidery, reductive, graphic, intuitive and freehand are just some of the approaches represented here. This curatorial exercise seeks to highlight at once both similarities and differences, creating a rich mixture of dialogues and contrasts.” –Yifat Gat

Artists include:
David Rhodes, Izabela Kowalczyk, Michael Woody, Eve Aschheim, Didier Petit, Matthew Deleget, Peter Shear, Meg Lipke, Rieko Koga, Ben Alper, Brian Edmonds, Hooper Turner, Niall De Buitléar, Don Voisine, Paul Pagk, Armelle De Sainte Marie, Claire Colin-Collin, Marie-Claude Bugeaud, Ruri Yi, Joris Brantuas, Brian Cypher, Laura Charlton, Emily Noelle Lambert, Chaim Machlev, Brynn Higgins-Stirrup, Karl Bielik, Patrice Pantin, Jeremie Delhome, Michael Voss, Ky Anderson, Alain Biltereyst, Shawn Stipling, Marion Piper, Gabriele Herzog, Katherine Bradford, Rosaire Appel, Jérémy Laffon, Jasper van der Graaf, Tilman Hoepfl, Daniel G. Hill, Pete Schulte, Lydia Rump, Yoav Efrati, Ward Schumaker, Richard Van der Aa, Gary Petersen, Benjamin Gardner, Ian White Williams, Oriane Stender, Pierre Neyrand, Christine Mahoney, Espen Erichsen, Leeza Doreian, Béatrice Beha, Robert Otto Epstein, Heidi Pollard, Lael Marshall, Catherine Haggarty, Clinton King, Mark Sengbusch

The Black & White Project is an ongoing exploration that started as a curatorial post on the Look & Listen blog. In 2014 it was expanded into an exhibition at the Look & Listen Gallery, presenting works by 30 international artists. An accompanying publication including works by 100 artists from around the world was added specifically for the London Sluice Art fair. A print edition with works by 6 artists, printed by Atelier Tchikebe, was added to the project in 2015.

This exhibition at Transmitter will be the fifth iteration of The Black & White Project, featuring 59 artists from around the world.

The publication is available at: www.blurb.com/b/6482193-the-black-white-project

posted August 12, 2016 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Artist Talk with Curator Jeffrey Uslip

Installation view of Matthew Deleget: Vanitas, Phillip Slein Gallery, St Louis, MO, 2016

Artist Talk with Curator Jeffrey Uslip
Philip Slein Gallery
4735 McPherson Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63108
www.philipsleingallery.com
Saturday, March 12, 2pm

Jeffrey Uslip joined the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis as chief curator in February of 2014, and was recently appointed to the newly created post of deputy director for exhibitions and programs. Since then, he has organized shows with Hurvin Anderson, Joe Goode, Jesse Howard, Joyce Pensato, Lisa Yuskavage, Wyatt Kahn, Jon Rafman, Arcangelo Sassolino, Michael Staniak, Liat Yossifor, and Robert Swain. Most recently, Uslip organized a show for 2016 Driskell Prize winner, Mark Bradford. Uslip has also organized exhibitions for PS1/MoMA, New York; Artists Space, New York; Columbia University’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, California State University, Los Angeles; and LA><ART, Los Angeles. He has lectured at the Yale University School of Art, New Haven, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, and is an online contributor to Artforum.

Image:
Installation view of Matthew Deleget: Vanitas, Phillip Slein Gallery, St Louis, MO

posted March 07, 2016 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , ,

Matthew Deleget: Vanitas

Matthew Deleget, Vanitas (Sun Yellow), 2014, Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame, 21 x 25 x 3.5 inches

Matthew Deleget: Vanitas
Philip Slein Gallery
4735 McPherson Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63108
www.philipsleingallery.com
January 29 – March 12, 2016
Opening: Friday, January 29, 5-8pm
Gallery Talk with Curator Jeffrey Uslip: Saturday, March 12, 2pm

Matthew Deleget is the founder and director of Minus Space Gallery, who has exhibited his work nationally and internationally. His work was included in the 2014 Whitney Biennial and is in the collection of the Saint Louis Art Museum. Matthew writes regarding the Vanitas paintings:

“For this exhibition, I am presenting a suite of new monochrome paintings made of enamel spray paint on canvas and highly decorative frames. The works fuse painting and its formal presentation into a single visual experience and examine perceived issues of taste and authority within the theater of an exhibition space. These works were specifically informed by Dutch vanitas/still life painting of the 16th-17th centuries, Piet Mondrian’s neoplastic paintings from the 1920s-1940s, and the Radical Painting Group active in NYC during the 1970s-1980s.”

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Vanitas (Sun Yellow), 2014
Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame
21 x 25 x 3.5 inches

posted March 01, 2016 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , ,

Julian Dashper and Friends

Matthew Deleget, Zero-Sum (Midwestern Unlike You and Me, New Zealand's Julian Dashper), 2013, Discarded monograph on Julian Dashper, 10 x 8.5 x .25 inches, 25 x 22 x 1 cm

Julian Dashper and Friends
PS projectspace
Madurastraat 72
1094 GR Amsterdam Netherlands
http://www.psprojectspace.nl
February 29 – May 1, 2016
Opening: Monday, February 29, 6-8pm

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Zero-Sum (Midwestern Unlike You and Me, New Zealand’s Julian Dashper), 2013
Discarded monograph on Julian Dashper
10 x 8.5 x .25 inches, 25 x 22 x 1 cm

posted February 29, 2016 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , ,

The Nomination Granting Process: Matthew Deleget in conversation with Allison Hawkins & Shervone Neckles

nyaa

The Nomination Granting Process:
Matthew Deleget in conversation with Allison Hawkins and Shervone Neckles
Joan Mitchell Foundation
Professional Practice Lecture Series
New York Academy of Art
111 Franklin Street
New York, NY 10013
www.nyaa.edu
Wednesday, February 10, 6-7:30pm

Allison Hawkins, Grants Program Director, Joan Mitchell Foundation
Serving as the Grants Program Director at the Joan Mitchell Foundation since 2005, Allison Hawkins administers the Foundation’s grant funding to individual visual artists and arts organizations nationally. She is also active in the National Coalition for Arts Preparedness and Emergency Response. Prior to her time at the Foundation, Allison worked at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the Grants Office of their Education Department. Also an artist, Allison received her MFA from the School of Visual Arts and BA in Studio Art and Art History from Kenyon College. She has exhibited both in the US and abroad and is represented by the Proposition Gallery in New York, NY. Allison grew up in Missouri and Ohio, and now lives in Brooklyn with her husband and daughter.

Shervone Neckles-Ortiz, Artist Support Manager, Joan Mitchell Foundation
Serves as the Manager for New York City and national programs for both the Creating a Living Legacy (CALL) Program and Professional Development Program of the Joan Mitchell Foundation. Before joining the Foundation, Neckles-Ortiz worked as an Art Education consultant and Adjunct Professor for Pratt Institute and other leading NYC art institutions and organizations. For several years, Neckles-Ortiz served her Brooklyn community as a high school teacher in the NYC Department of Education before moving into roles as a Department Chair and contributor to the Arts Achieve: Investing in Innovation (i3) Grant Program.

As an interdisciplinary artist Neckles-Ortiz has held residencies at the Youlou Arts Foundation, the Elizabeth Foundation SHIFT Program, the Center for Book Arts, The Fabric Workshop & Museum, and The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Previous awards include grants from Queens Arts Fund, The Puffin Foundation, Joan Mitchell Foundation, as well as fellowships from Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop and Manhattan Graphic Center. Her work has been shown worldwide in both solo and group exhibitions. Her practice also has included curatorial projects with Pratt Center for Community Development and Bedford-ï ˜Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation, and at the Ice Box Gallery in Philadelphia. She’s earned an M.A. from Teacher’s College, Columbia University, MFA from Queens College and BFA from the College of New Rochelle. Her work can be seen at www.shervoneneckles.com

posted February 10, 2016 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , ,

Art Fairs: Matthew Deleget in Conversation with Helen Toomer

Helen Toomer

Art Fairs: Matthew Deleget in Conversation with Helen Toomer
Director of Pulse Contemporary Art Fair
Professional Practice Lecture Series
New York Academy of Art
111 Franklin Street
New York, NY 10013
www.nyaa.edu
Wednesday, February 3, 6-7:30pm

Helen Toomer is the Director of PULSE Contemporary Art Fair. A respected leader in the art and design industries, she has extensive experience with event development, marketing, partnerships, operations and management in both Europe and the United States. In addition to her art fair experience, Helen is also an Adjunct Professor at The Fashion Institute of Technology for the postgraduate course, Art Market: Principles and Practices, and owned a contemporary art gallery on New York’s Lower East Side from 2011-2013. Helen is British and graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Arts institute of Bournemouth, England.

posted February 01, 2016 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , ,

Accrochage

Accrochage, Dr Julius AP, Berlin, Germany

Accrochage
Dr. Julius | AP
Leberstraße 60
10829 Berlin Germany
www.dr-julius.de
January 29 – March 5, 2016

Image:
Installation view

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Insight? Outta Site! Open Forum Series

nashvillepubliclibrary

Matthew Deleget: Artist as Catalyst
Interviewed by artist Jodi Hays
Insight? Outta Site! Open Forum Series
Seed Space at the Nashville Public Library
615 Church Street
Nashville, TN 37219
www.seedspace.org
Saturday, January 30, 12-1pm

posted January 30, 2016 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , ,

New York’s Artist-Run Galleries You Need to Know

Matthew Deleget & Rossana Martinez

New York’s Artist-Run Galleries You Need to Know, Part I
by Emily Torrey
Artsy
November 13, 2015
www.artsy.net

Husband-and-wife duo Matthew Deleget and Rossana Martinez launched MINUS SPACE in 2003. At the time, the project was purely an online platform: “a hybrid social network, blog, news, and art historical site.” After three years, the group started presenting physical projects in Gowanus, converting half of their shared studio space. In 2008, MoMA PS1 took note of the collective’s focus on new approaches to minimalist abstraction, inviting MINUS SPACE to curate a 54-artist show at the museum. And this past May, the duo set up shop in their first ground-floor gallery in DUMBO.

Artsy: How do you balance your own art practices with running the gallery?

Minus Space: It’s a persistent challenge, to say the least. In addition to our individual studio practices and the gallery, we’re also raising a family together — we have a six-year-old son named Mateo. We honestly don’t see any distinction, though, between what we do in our studios and what we do at the gallery. They are both the direct expressions of creative ideas.

Artsy: In your opinion, what makes a gallery successful?

MS: We equate being successful with mounting innovative exhibitions and changing the artistic discourse within our discipline. With the gallery, our goals are to be totally uncompromised and self-sustaining. It’s a challenge, for sure, but they are not mutually exclusive.

Artsy: Do artists make better gallerists?

MS: Artists do make compelling gallerists and there is a very long tradition here in New York of artist-founded/run galleries, alternative spaces, and museums. Artists also generally tend to be way ahead of the curve in terms identifying new ideas and trends, as well as recognizing artists the general art world has overlooked, especially artist’s artists.

posted November 13, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , ,

Artist Talk

sva-artisttalk

Artist Talk
School of Visual Arts
133/141 West 21st Street, Room 101C
New York, NY
www.sva.edu
Tuesday, October 27, 6-7:30pm
Free and open to the public

“Matthew Deleget, an artist, curator and writer and director of the Minus Space gallery in Brooklyn, talks about his work. Deleget’s work was recently featured in the 2014 Whitney Biennial, and he has shown his work in numerous international solo and group exhibitions. Presented by MFA Fine Arts.”

posted October 26, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , ,

Matthew Deleget & Rossana Martinez: With You in Constant Conversation

Matthew Deleget, Zero-Sum (Abstract in America), 2015, Discounted art books and shelf, 22 x 12 x 3.5 inches

Matthew Deleget & Rossana Martinez: With You in Constant Conversation
Schneider Museum of Art, Southern Oregon University
1250 Siskiyou Boulevard
Ashland, OR 97520
http://sma.sou.edu
October 1 – December 5, 2015
Artist Talk: Wednesday, September 30, 6:30pm
Opening: Thursday, October 1, 5-7pm

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Zero-Sum (Abstract in America), 2015
Discounted art books and shelf
22 x 12 x 3.5 inches

posted September 22, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , ,

Breaking Pattern

Michael Scott, #98, 2012, Black gloss enamel on aluminum, 63 x 63 inches / 160 x 160 cm, Courtesy of the artist and Sandra Gering Gallery

Breaking Pattern
Curated by Matthew Deleget & Rossana Martinez
Schneider Museum of Art, Southern Oregon University
1250 Siskiyou Boulevard
Ashland, OR 97520
http://sma.sou.edu
October 1 – December 5, 2015
Public Lecture by Matthew Deleget: Wednesday, September 30, 6:30pm
Opening: Thursday, October 1, 5-7pm

Participating Artists:
Gabriele Evertz, Anoka Faruqee, Michelle Grabner, Gilbert Hsiao, Douglas Melini, Brian Porray, Michael Scott

This fall, the Schneider Museum of Art (SMA) will present Breaking Pattern, an exhibition curated by Matthew Deleget and Rossana Martinez of the Brooklyn-based gallery MINUS SPACE. The exhibition will highlight several generations of artists from coast to coast whose works investigate and advance the discourse around pattern, optical, and perceptual abstract painting. The community is invited to the opening reception of Breaking Pattern on Thursday, October 1 from 5:00 to 7:00 PM.

The Museum will show the works of seven artists. Michelle Grabner has exhibited her work at Musée d’art Grand-Duc Jean, Luxembourg and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. She also co-curated the 2014 Whitney Biennial and will curate the next Portland Biennial exhibition (Summer 2016). Gabriele Evertz’s artwork is included in the public collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Metropolitan Museum of Art among others. Anoka Faruqee is an associate professor at the Yale School of Art. She has exhibited her work at MoMA/PS1 in New York, Albright-Knox Gallery in New York and is an alumna of the Whitney Independent Study Program. Gilbert Hsiao has received awards from the New York Foundation for the Arts and the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation and has shown in Australia, Canada, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, New Zealand and Thailand. Douglas Melini received a painting fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts. His work has been reviewed in publications, such as Artcritical, Hyperallergic, The New York Times, Huffington Post, and Time Out New York. Brian Porray’s most recent exhibitions include Abstracted Visions: Information Mapping from Mystic Diagrams to Data Visualizations at Cerritos College Art Gallery in Norwalk CA and Plant People at GAR Gallery in Galveston TX. Michael Scott has worked internationally for the last three decades exhibiting at Le Consortium (Dijon, France) and Musée des Beaux Arts (La Chaux de Fonds, Switzerland) among others.

The curators of Breaking Pattern are respective artists themselves and the Museum will feature their installations in the Treehaven Gallery: Sweet Like Candy to My Soul by Rossana Martinez and Zero-Sum by Matthew Deleget. Scott Malbaurn, Schneider Museum of Art Director explains, “More and more artists today are beginning to wear many hats, from curating to art criticism and gallery operations. This is a great example of today’s contemporary art discourse.”

Please join us on Thursday, October 1 from 5:00 to 7:00 PM for the opening reception of Breaking Pattern. Crater Lake Cellars is generously donating and pouring wine for this reception. During the reception, performances at the Museum’s courtyard will include the Maraval Rd. steel drum band, and a theater mask and movement medley by Oregon Center for the Arts students.

The exhibition will be on view from Friday, October 24 to Saturday, December 5, 2015. Regular Museum hours are Monday through Saturday, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Matthew Deleget will give a free public lecture on Wednesday, September 30 at 6:30 PM in the Meese Auditorium. He will speak on his different roles as an artist, a curator, and a gallerist.

Three FREE Family Days will accompany the fall exhibition on Saturday, October 4, Saturday, November 7, and Saturday, December 5, from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM. The Museum will also hold Tuesday Tours – weekly docent-led educational tours for the public on Tuesdays at noon. Please call to schedule a special tour for your group. The Schneider Museum of Art’s fall exhibition is generously supported by Crater Lake Cellars, Art Works-the National Endowment for the Arts, the Oregon Arts Commission, The Ford Family Foundation, Market of Choice, Rogue Frameworks, and Wooldridge Creek Winery.

Please join us for the following fall exhibition events:

Wednesday, September 30, 6:30 PM
Public Lecture by Matthew Deleget, Curator and Participating Artist, Breaking Pattern

Thursday, October 1, 5:00 – 7:00 PM
Exhibition Opening Reception
Crater Lake Cellars is generously donating and pouring wine at the reception.

Friday, October 2 through Saturday, December 5
Exhibition Open for Regular Museum Hours of 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM, Monday through Saturday

Image:
Michael Scott, #98, 2012
Black gloss enamel on aluminum, 63 x 63 inches / 160 x 160 cm
Courtesy of the artist and Sandra Gering Gallery

posted September 21, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Black & White Project

The Black & White Project Book

The Black & White Project: A Survey of B&W Works by 100 International Artists
by Yifat Gat
Published by Look & Listen, 2015
8 × 10 inches / 21 × 26 cm
Hardcover, 114 Pages
ISBN: 9781518494062

About the Book
The Black & White Project is an ongoing exploration that started as a curatorial post on the LOOK&LISTEN blog. In 2014 it was expanded into an exhibition at the L&L gallery, presenting works by 30 international artists. This publication includes works by 100 artists from around the world. The Co-edition with Atelier Tchikebe includes works by 6 artists.

The very nature of working in B&W lends a sense of unity, which facilitates the assemblage of works from a broad painterly range. Illustrative, grid-based, drawing, embroidery, reductive, graphic, intuitive and freehand are just some of the approaches represented here. This curatorial exercise looks to highlight both similarities and differences, creating a rich mixture of dialogues and contrasts.

Look & Listen
www.lookelisten.net

The Black & White Project
www.lookelisten.net/the-blackwhite-project

Order the Book
www.blurb.com/b/6482193-the-black-white-project

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Interview with David Diao

David Diao, Little Suprematist Prison #16, 1986, Acrylic on canvas, 32 x 16 inches

Interview with David Diao
by Matthew Deleget
Bomb Magazine
Fall 2015, p. 48-57
www.bombmagazine.org

I had the great honor of interviewing painter David Diao​ about his work and new retrospective at the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing for the Fall issue of Bomb Magazine. We had an unforgettable three-hour-long conversation at his studio and ended up with well over 20K words. A short excerpt of our conversation was published in the Fall 2015 issue of Bomb Magazine.

Read interview.

Image:
David Diao
Little Suprematist Prison #16, 1986
Acrylic on canvas
32 x 16 inches

posted September 20, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , ,

Concrete Post 3

Matthew Deleget, High Value Target, 2014, Fluorescent orange enamel spray paint on wooden panel, 24 x 24 inches

Concrete Post 3: Internationale Vernetzung im Grenzbereich der Konkreten
raum2810
Orchideenweg 45
Bonn, Germany
www.raum2810.de
August 14 – September 18, 2015
Opening: Friday, August 14, 6-9pm
Artist Talk: Saturday, August 22, 2pm
Exhibition Tour: Saturday, August 22, 4pm

Participating Artists:
Tim Allen (UK), John Beech (UK/USA), Shiau-Peng Chen (TWN), Christoph Dahlhausen (D), Mathew Deleget (USA), Michael Graeve (AUS), Atsuo Hukuda (JPN), Michael Jäger (D), WJM Kok (NL), Oleksiy Koval (UKR/D), Sally Mannall (AUS), Didier Mencoboni (F), Ivo Ringe (D), Jeena Shin (COR/NZ), Hanna Tai (AUS), Andy Tetzlaff (AUS/USA), David Thomas (AUS), Melanie Jayne Taylor (AUS), Cecilia Vissers (NL), Don Voisine (USA), Jana Wellendorf (D)

Image:
Matthew Deleget
High Value Target, 2014
Fluorescent orange enamel spray paint on wooden panel
24 x 24 inches

posted August 05, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , ,

Summer Group Show

Matthew Deleget, Vanitas (True Blue), 2014, Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame, 23 x 27 x 3 inches

Summer Group Show
Peter Blake Gallery
435 Ocean Avenue
Laguna Beach, CA 92651
www.peterblakegallery.com
July 31 – August 31, 2015
Opening: Thursday, August 6

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Vanitas (True Blue), 2014
Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame
23 x 27 x 3 inches

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Revitalization by Contamination: OBJECT’hood at Lesley Heller

Revitalization by Contamination: OBJECT'hood at Lesley Heller, by Jonathan Stevenson, Two Coats of Paint, August 2, 2015

Revitalization by Contamination: OBJECT’hood at Lesley Heller
By Jonathan Stevenson
Two Coats of Paint
August 2, 2015
www.twocoatsofpaint.com

“…Peter Dudek’s foreboding mock-brutalist cardboard sculpture of a prison-like structure — titled Who Goes There — and Matthew Deleget’s hauntingly reductive black plastic installation Failed State are fitting segues to an evolved obsession with security…”

posted August 02, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , ,

Object’hood

Matthew Deleget, Failed State, 2015, Black plastic garbage bags, hung upside down, static electricity, black pushpins, Dimensions variable; Installation view at Lesley Heller Workspace, New York, 2015

Object’hood
Curated by Gelah Penn & Inna Babaeva
Lesley Heller Workspace
54 Orchard Street
New York, NY 10002
www.lesleyheller.com
July 22 – August 21, 2015
Opening:: Wednesday, July 22, 6–8pm

Lesley Heller Workspace is delighted to present object’hood, an exhibition curated by artists Inna Babaeva and Gelah Penn, July 22 – August 21, 2015. Opening reception: Wednesday, July 22, 6 – 8 PM.

Front Gallery and Workspace: In the past few years, there has been an exciting resurgence in sculpture. The reinvigoration of the medium has simmered quietly alongside a more public interest in painting. However, the current breadth, energy and sheer number of vibrant works being made in three dimensions call out for close examination. For object’hood, Penn and Babaeva have selected artists who mine the depths of other disciplines in order to inform and enrich their work, resulting in a kind of revitalization through contamination. Referencing painting, installation, drawing, architecture, pattern and decoration, craft, design, video, photography and material culture, these artists have constructed pieces that are extraordinarily rich pictorially, thematically and materially. These “porous” objects reside in a complex locus of their own invention and speak to each other in strong, sonorous voices—lyrical, cacophonous, playful, anxiety-ridden—that command our attention.

Artists in the exhibition:
Rachel Beach, Katie Bell, Isidro Blasco, Nicole Cherubini, Martha Clippinger, Joy Curtis, Matthew Deleget, Peter Dudek, Kate Gilmore, Don Gummer, Mike Hein, Elana Herzog, Lisa Hoke, Christopher Joy, Harry E. Leigh, Elisa Lendvay, Doreen McCarthy, Sheila Pepe, Sarah Peters, Judy Pfaff, Don Porcaro, Elise Siegel, Kirk Stoller, Daniel Wiener, Letha Wilson

Inna Babaeva is a visual artist born in Lvov, Ukraine. She received her MFA from Rutgers University. She was a 2014 Rema Hort Mann Foundation Grant nominee and is currently a resident at the Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program in Dumbo, Brooklyn. Her work has been exhibited at Anna Kustera Gallery, Brian Morris Gallery, Underdonk, Storefront Ten Eyck and Brooklyn Academy of Music (NYC). Babaeva’s work has been reviewed in ArtFCity, Sleek magazine and Artnews, and featured on “Gorky’s Granddaughter” and “Progress Report” video blogs. The artist lives and works in New York City. www.innababaeva.com

Gelah Penn’s work has been exhibited widely, including solo and group exhibitions at Lori Bookstein Fine Art, Foley Gallery, Smack Mellon, National Academy Museum, Sculpture Center, Jason McCoy Gallery, Lesley Heller Workspace (NYC); Carl Berg Projects (CA); Real Art Ways (CT); Clark University (MA); Brattleboro Museum (VT); Itami Museum (Japan); and Bibliotheque Municipale Louis Nucera (France).Her work is in the collections of the Brooklyn Museum, Cleveland Institute of Art (OH), Columbus Museum (GA) and Weatherspoon Art Museum (NC), and has been reviewed in numerous publications, including Art in America, The New York Times, The Brooklyn Rail and a feature in Sculpture Magazine. Penn has received fellowships from the Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation, Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony. She is co-curating, with painter and writer Stephen Maine, the exhibition Diphthong at the Shirley Fiterman Art Center (NYC) in 2015. www.gelahpenn.com

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Failed State, 2015
Black plastic garbage bags, hung upside down, static electricity, black pushpins
Dimensions variable
Installation view at Lesley Heller Workspace, New York, NY, 2015

posted July 22, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

9 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before July 24

Matthew Deleget, Failed State (detail), 2015, Black plastic garbage bags, hung upside down, static electricity, black pushpins, Dimensions variable

9 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before July 24
By Paul Laster
New York Observer
www.observer.com
July 20, 2015

“A sprawling group show, “Object’hood” offers the work of 25 artists in mediums ranging from painting and photography to architecture and design. Isidro Blasco assembles his photos of a 360-degree view of Shanghai into a 3D, pop-up-book; Matthew Deleget makes a mural from black garbage bags mounted on the wall via static electricity; and Kate Gilmore offers photo-documentation of her act of bashing a hole through a partially painted sheetrock wall on a beach—thus providing a pathway to the sea.”

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Failed State (detail), 2015
Black plastic garbage bags, hung upside down, static electricity, black pushpins
Dimensions variable
Installation view at Lesley Heller Workspace, New York, NY, 2015

posted July 20, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , ,

Visiting Artist

NARS Foundation

Visiting Artist
NARS Foundation
201 46th Street, 4th Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11220
www.narsfoundation.org
Tuesday, June 16, 2015

The New York Art Residency and Studios (NARS) Foundation is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit arts organization committed to supporting artists and curators on an international level as well engaging the local community in Brooklyn and the Greater New York area. NARS provides an array of creative support services and professional development opportunities for emerging and mid-career artists through short-term integrated residency programs, affordable long-term studio spaces, progressive exhibition programs, international exchanges, and engaging public programs that foster global understanding and dynamic cross-cultural dialogues. These services operate in conjunction with our community outreach initiatives to promote greater accessibility to contemporary art for the under-served local community in south Brooklyn. Our mission is to present diverse platforms on which to nurture creative inspiration and innovative cross-pollination of ideas.

posted June 16, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: ,

The 2014 Whitney Biennial: the Book as a Medium in Contemporary American Art

The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, June 2015

The 2014 Whitney Biennial: the Book as a Medium in Contemporary American Art
By Michael Thompson
The Papers of the Bibliographic Society of America
Volume 109:2, June 2015
www.bibsocamer.org

“Matthew Deleget takes aim, deconstructively, at the history of abstract and minimalist painting in the twentieth century. His deconstruction is both analytical, as in his Whitney piece, and physical. Physically, his strategies include hanging a blank canvas on a gallery wall and then painting it and the adjacent areas of the wall with spray paint, painting with randomly selected colors in a random pattern and, most interestingly, actually destroying a monochromatic canvas, similar to those of Frank Stella and Ad Reinhardt, and displaying the resulting detritus as art. Taking up where Krauss, Kosuth, and Judd leave off, he starts with the final logical extreme of minimalism, a monochromatic painting, and then moves a step beyond it.

His work at the Biennial, called Zero-Sum, was a vitrine containing forty-two monographs from his personal library, all of which were pur- chased at a discount or had been discarded, which to Deleget reflects the shifting tastes of the marketplace for art (see fig. 8).37 The idea came to him when he saw a copy of Circle; International Survey of Constructive Art being used as a doorstop. Eight titles in Zero-Sum are by or about Alfred Jensen (1903–81), one about fellow Biennial artist David Diao (b. 1943), and the rest about contemporary artists exploring minimalist abstraction.

In his own words, through this work he has become “an advocate for artists and ideas that are extraordinary but that are generally overlooked, unfashionable, unmarketable, or, worst, discounted altogether…By thinking of these books as works of art, I’ve brought them back full circle into the realm of ideas and aesthetics.” There is a connection here to his physical destruction of monochromatic paintings, since in each case he addresses the minimalist issues of painting by not creating a painting at all but by moving an existing painting into the realm of what Marcel Duchamp called “the service of the mind.”

Read entire article (PDF).

posted June 01, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

In Screenwriter Chiswell Langhorne’s Library, Art and Books Vie for Shelf Space

Matthew Deleget, In Screenwriter Chiswell Langhorne's Library, Art and Books Vie for Shelf Space, Artspace

How I Collect
In Screenwriter Chiswell Langhorne’s Library, Art and Books Vie for Shelf Space
by Artspace Editors
Artspace
May 21, 2015
www.artspace.com

“…The frame piece is by Mathew Deleget [No Mans Land, 2008]. I saw his work in Art Miami in 2013, at the Peter Blake gallery booth. I find it very hard to go to fairs, because there’s so much visual information. I just thought it was interesting that someone was showing canvases with the center missing….”

Read article.

Image:
A view of the library in collector Chiswell Langhorne’s New York apartment
Photograph by Paul Lewis.

posted May 21, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: ,

Artist as Curator Panel

Artist as Curator Panel, Select Art Fair, 2015

Artist as Curator Panel
Select Art Fair
548 W. 22nd Street
New York, NY
www.select-fair.com
Saturday, May 16, 4-5:30pm

Moderated by: Andrew Prayzner & Katerina Lanfranco
Panelists: Matthew Deleget, Benjamin King, Mira Schor, Julie Torres, Sun You & Yin Ho

posted May 16, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , ,

Peter Blake Gallery at Art Miami New York 2015

Peter Blake Gallery, Art Miami New York, 2015

Peter Blake Gallery
Art Miami New York 2015
Pier 94
12th Avenue at 55th Street
New York, NY 10019
May 14-17, 2015
www.artnyfair.com

posted May 14, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , ,

Domino Magazine

Matthew Deleget, Domino Magazine, Spring 2015

Matthew Deleget
Domino Magazine
Spring 2015, p.52
www.domino.com

For Brooklyn-based Deleget, artistic inspiration comes from carefully observing the world around him. “Ideas can come from anywhere,” he says. “Everyday life, especially in New York City, is an endless source of creative stimulation.” His pieces — often crafted with acrylic or enamel spray paint — represent what Deleget calls “reductive abstraction,” characterized by humble materials, limited color, and repetition. In 2003, he and his wife, Rossana Martinez, opened Minus Space, a Brooklyn gallery and community platform that showcases the work of dozens of artists. “I’m motivated by the idea of inventing something new,” Deleget says, “something that hasn’t existed before and that advances the conversation.”

posted March 12, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , ,

Concrete Post 2

Matthew Deleget, Death Benefit, 2014, Gold enamel spray paint on wooden panels, diptych, 24 x 43 inches overall, 24 x 20 inches each

Concrete Post 2
Project Space / Spare Room Gallery
RMIT University
Melbourne, Australia
schoolofartgalleries.dsc.rmit.edu.au
April 3 – May 14, 2015
Opening Reception: Thursday, April 2, 5-7pm
Floor Talk: Thursday, April 23, 12:30pm

Participating Artists:
John Beech, Matthew Deleget, Christoph Dahlhausen, Atsuo Hukada, Hanna Tai, Melanie Jayne Taylor, Andrew Tetzlaff, David Thomas, Jana Wellendorf

CONCRETE POST is a collective who explores the known and felt experience through a sensitive engagement with Concrete Art, light, colour, installation and materiality. Artists will work together to produce, not a group show, but rather a composite artwork that unfolds over time and reveals itself through curiosity.

Image:
Matthew Deleget, Death Benefit, 2014
Gold enamel spray paint on wooden panels, diptych
24 x 43 inches overall, 24 x 20 inches each

posted February 20, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This Color Is You

Matthew Deleget, Vanitas (Ford Blue), 2014, Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame, 16.25 x 19.25 x 1.5 inches

This Color Is You
Curated by Bill Carroll
Blackburn 20|20 Gallery
EFA Center
323 W. 39th Street
New York, NY 10018
www.rbpmw-efanyc.org March 3-27, 2015
Opening: March 3, 6-9pm
Hours: Thursday-Saturday, 12-6pm

Participating Artists:
Matthew Deleget, Nicholas Howey, John Monti, Morgan O’Hara, Gary Petersen, Cordy Ryman, Howard Smith, Thornton Willis

Image:
Matthew Deleget, Vanitas (Ford Blue), 2014
Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame
16.25 x 19.25 x 1.5 inches

posted February 19, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Peter Blake Gallery at Palm Springs Fine Art Fair

Matthew Deleget, Vanitas (Black), 2014, Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame, diptych, 19.25 x 15.25 x 1.5 inches each, 19.25 x 32.5 x 1.5 inches overall

Peter Blake Gallery
Palm Springs Fine Art Fair
Palm Springs Convention Center
277 N. Avenida Caballeros
Palm Springs CA 92262
www.palmspringsfineartfair.com

Opening Night Preview: Thursday, February 12, 7:30-9:30pm
Friday, February 13, 11am-7pm
Saturday, February 14, 11am-7pm
Sunday, February 15, 11am-6pm

Image:
Matthew Deleget, Vanitas (Black), 2014
Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame, diptych
19.25 x 15.25 x 1.5 inches each, 19.25 x 32.5 x 1.5 inches overall

posted February 12, 2015 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , ,

Domino Magazine

Matthew Deleget: Related Lines Exhibition, Domino Magazine, February 2015

Matthew Deleget: Related Lines Exhibition
Domino Magazine
February 12, 2015
www.domino.com

Domino fave Matthew Deleget’s latest exhibit is a modern visual exercise in color and scale.

For his most recent showing — a two-person exhibition with artist Hartmut Bohm — reductive abstract artist extraordinaire Matthew Deleget experiments with methods of color field painting, which are usually of a grandiose scale. The show, on display at Dr. Julius AP from November 13, 2014 through January 24, 2015, was inspired by “shuffle” feature on most mp3 players and inverts traditional color patterns Deleget selected at random. “With these new paintings,” Deleget explains, “I’m interested to see if an intense color experience can happen on a minute scale.”

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The Big Show / An Artist’s Artist / Every Art Buyer’s Fantasy

The Big Show / An Artist's Artist / Every Art Buyer's Fantasy, by Richard Paige, Wabash Magazine, Fall 2014, p.46-49

The Big Show / An Artist’s Artist / Every Art Buyer’s Fantasy
by Richard Paige
Wabash Magazine
Fall 2014
p.46-49

posted January 23, 2015 | Comments (0)

Peter Blake Gallery at LA Art Show 2015

Matthew Deleget, Vanitas (Pewter Gray), 2014, Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame, 21.5 x 25.5 x 3 inches

Peter Blake Gallery
Los Angeles Convention Center
South Hall J and K, 1201 South Figueroa Street
Los Angeles, CA 90015
www.laartshow.com

Thursday Jan. 15, 2015, 11am – 7pm
Friday Jan. 16, 2015, 11am – 7pm
Saturday Jan. 17, 2015, 11am – 7pm
Sunday Jan. 18, 2015, 11am – 5pm

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Vanitas (Pewter Gray), 2014
Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame
21.5 x 25.5 x 3 inches

posted January 10, 2015 | Comments (0)

Unconfirmed Makeshift Museum

Matthew Deleget, Third World Democracy, 2014, Enamel spray paint on wooden panels, triptych, 24 x 60 inches overall, 24 x 18 inches each

Matthew Deleget, Linda Besemer / Erika Suderburg, The Museum of Beyond
Unconfirmed Makeshift Museum
Irvine, CA
www.unconfirmedmakeshiftmuseum.org
Opening: Saturday, December 6, 2014, 5-7pm
Hours: By appointment only

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Third World Democracy, 2014
Enamel spray paint on wooden panels, triptych
24 x 60 inches overall, 24 x 18 inches each

posted December 05, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , ,

Peter Blake Gallery at Art Miami 2014

Matthew Deleget, Failed State, 2014, Acrylic on panel hit with a hammer, 24 x 24 inches

Peter Blake Gallery
Booth #B35
The Art Miami Pavilion Midtown
Wynwood Arts District
3101 NE 1st Avenue Miami, FL 33137
www.art-miami.com

Wednesday, December 3, 11am-8pm
Thursday, December 4, 11am-8pm
Friday, December 5, 11am-8pm
Saturday, December 6, 11am-8pm
Sunday, December 7, 11am-6pm

I’m delighted to be exhibiting with Peter Blake Gallery at Art Miami 2014. Known as Miami’s premier anchor fair, Art Miami kicks off the opening day of Art Week — the first week of December when thousands of collectors, dealers, curators and artists descend upon Miami. World-famous for its stylish gallery-like decor, its outstanding quality and extraordinary variety, Art Miami showcases the best in modern and contemporary art from 125 international art galleries.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Failed State, 2014
Acrylic on panel hit with a hammer
24 x 24 inches

posted November 26, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , ,

Painting Black

Matthew Deleget, Lethal Support, 2014, Acrylic paint on panel, hit with a hammer, 24 x 20 inches / 61 x 51 cm

Painting Black
Curated by Ivo Ringe & Joe Barnes
The Sylvia Wald and Po Kim Art Gallery
417 Lafayette Street, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10003
www.waldandkimgallery.org
November 18 – December 13, 2014
Opening: Tuesday, November 18, 6-8pm

This exhibition of paintings featuring the color black — all of relatively small size to enhance visual coherence — was curated by the German artist Ivo Ringe and the American artist, Joe Barnes. The exhibition concept was developed by Ivo Ringe, Joe Barnes and Po Kim, the Korean-American artist and co-founder of the Sylvia Wald and Po Kim Art Gallery.

The exhibition curators have made the following statement concerning the theme of “Painting Black”: Every painter has the “non-color” black as his ultimate antagonist. When everything is black, we cannot see anything anymore — only black. All is hidden within the blackness and has no figure or form. Black swallows all. This addresses the core-issue of the painter: To shape and figure existence, to allow differentiation to shine — background and foreground, form and size — articulated from the mere infinite. Then how can black support this pursuit rather than rendering it invisible? Black can be used as a means of structure. It allows the distinction between surface and background. Black can highlight plasticity and depth. Many artists have had periods in which they were fascinated by the conditions that black offers. They have used it as a means to focus on the artistic process of creation. The artists shown in the exhibition are distinguished by the fact that they manage to convey dimension, structure and meaning in spite of the “hindrance” of the non-color: black. As a result, their works act as meditative contemplations, artworks which open portals within ourselves.

The exhibition includes artists from the United States and several European nations. As such, it continues one of the missions of the Wald/Kim Gallery: working with national and international artists to provide a catalyst for intercultural dialogue between the diverse artistic community of New York and the artistic communities of the world. By working together with national and international artists, the organization aims to provide a catalyst for deeper intercultural dialogue between the diverse community of New York and the artistic communities of the world Contemporary artists in the exhibition:

Tim Allen (Great Britain)
Amy Antin (USA/ Germany)
Joe Barnes (USA)
Wayne Barnes (USA)
Mats Bergquist (Sweden/Italy)
Alain Biltereyst (Belgium)
Katrina Blannin (Great Britain/Sweden)
Britta Bogers (Germany)
Paul Brand (Switzerland/Norway)
Vincent Como (USA)
Christoph Dahlhausen (Germany)
Matthew Deleget (USA)
Edgar Diehl (Germany)
Rupert Eder (Germany)
Friedhelm Falke (Germany)
Jon Groom (Great Britain/Germany)
Mark Harrington (USA/Germany)
Michelle Jaffé (USA)
Michael Jäger (Germany)
Bruno Kurz (Germany)
Erin Lawlor (Great Britain)
Robert C. Morgan (USA)
Udo Rathke (Germany)
Ivo Ringe (Germany)
Rolf Rose (Germany)
Barbara Rosengarth (Germany)
Michel Rouillard (USA)
Richard Schneider (Germany)
Regine Schumann (Germany)
Jürg Stäuble (Switzerland)
Heiner Thiel (Germany)
Dolf Verlinden (The Netherlands)
Cecilia Vissers (The Netherlands)
Don Voisine (USA)
Maria Wallenstal-Schoenberg (Sweden/Germany)
Miro Zahra (Germany)

To add historical perspective to the exhibition, two American artists of the Abstract Expressionist era who often emphasized black in their work are included: Rollin Crampton and Sal Sirugo.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Lethal Support, 2014
Acrylic paint on panel, hit with a hammer
24 x 20 inches / 61 x 51 cm

posted November 17, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , ,

Matthew Deleget & Hartmut Böhm: Related Lines

Matthew Deleget, Shuffle (for Le Corbusier), 2014, Acrylic on canvas, 8 x 8 inches

Matthew Deleget & Hartmut Böhm: Related Lines
Dr. Julius AP
Leberstraße 60, 10829 Berlin Germany
www.dr-julius.de
November 13, 2014 – January 24, 2015
Opening: Thursday, November 13, 7-10pm

dr. julius | ap is pleased to announce the two-person exhibition Hartmut Böhm and Matthew Deleget: RELATED LINES. The two artists create a dynamic tension by belonging to different generations, as well as to European and American traditions of minimal concrete art and related cultural references. RELATED LINES is their first two-person exhibition with dr. julius | ap. Both artists were included in the 2012 international group show FutureShock OneTwo at the gallery. The two artists will interact with each other and with the gallery spaces through installation-like, precisely placed works.

Hartmut Böhm is a leading proponent of European Concrete art and one of the most influential reductive artists of his generation. Born in Kassel, Germany in 1938, he studied at Hochschule für Bildende Künste with Arnold Bode, founder and curator of Documenta. Böhm produced his first systems-based work in 1959. Several years later, his work was included in the seminal exhibition Nouvelle Tendance: Propositions visuelles du movement international at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, France in 1964. The exhibition heralded in the new Op, Kinetic, Concrete, Zero, GRAV, Gruppo T and Gruppo N art movements and highlighted works that addressed the concept of movement as conveyed through serial repetition.

Böhm has mounted more than seventy solo and two-person exhibitions since 1964 and has participated in hundreds of group exhibitions at museums, galleries and non-profits internationally. His work is included in seventy public collections worldwide, including the Neuberger Museum of Art [Purchase, NY]; Busch-Reisinger Museum, Harvard University [Cambridge, MA]; Josef Albers Museum [Bottrop, Germany]; Städtisches Kunstmuseum [Bonn, Germany]; Karl Ernst Osthaus Museum [Hagen, Germany]; Museum für konkrete Kunst [Ingolstadt, Germany]; Albertinum der Staatlichen Kunstsammlung [Dresden, Germany]; Wilhelm-Hack-Museum [Ludwigshafen, Germany]; Pinakothek der Moderne, Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus [Munich, Germany]; Stiftung für konkrete Kunst [Reutlingen, Germany]; Museum Ritter [Waldenbuch, Germany]; Donation Albers-Honegger [Mouans-Sartoux, France]; Musée Matisse [Le Cateau-Cambrésis, France]; Louisiana Museum for Moderne Kunst [Humlebæk, Denmark]; Muzeum Sztuki [Lodz, Poland]; Haus für konstruktive und konkrete Kunst [Zürich, Switzerland]; Richard Paul Lohse-Stiftung [Zürich, Switzerland]; Mondriaanhuis [Amersfoort, The Netherlands]; Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig [Vienna, Austria]; and Tel Aviv Museum of Art [Tel Aviv, Israel], among many others.

Matthew Deleget [*1972 in Hammond, Indiana, IN, US] is an artist, curator, and arts worker. Matthew has exhibited his work nationally and internationally, including solo and group exhibitions in the US, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. His work was included in the 2014 Whitney Biennial by Michelle Grabner at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. His additional museum exhibitions include MoMA/P.S.1 [Long Island City, NY]; Bronx Museum of the Arts [Bronx, NY]; Herbert F. Johnson Museum [Ithaca, NY]; Bass Museum of Art [Miami, FL]; and Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art [Indianapolis, IN].

Matthew’s work has been reviewed in Artforum, The New York Times, Hyperallergic, Flash Art, Artnet Magazine, and The Philadelphia Inquirer, among others. He is a member of American Abstract Artists, the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation’s Artist Advisory Committee, and the board of The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts.

In 2003, Matthew founded MINUS SPACE, a platform for reductive art on the international level based in Brooklyn, NY. Since 2006, he has organized nearly 50 solo and group exhibitions at both MINUS SPACE’s gallery in Dumbo, Brooklyn, as well as other collaborating venues on the national and international levels, including in Mexico, Belgium, Australia, and New Zealand.

MINUS SPACE exhibitions have been reviewed in Art in America, Artcritical, Artforum, Artnet Magazine, ArtNews, The Brooklyn Rail, Houston Public Radio, Huffington Post, The New Criterion, New York Magazine, NYFA Current, New York Sun, Time Out New York, Village Voice, and The Wall Street Journal, among others.

Matthew is represented by Alejandra von Hartz Gallery [Miami, FL]; Peter Blake Gallery [Laguna Beach, CA]; and Gallery Sonja Roesch [Houston, TX]. He holds an MFA in Painting and an MS in Theory, Criticism and History of Art, Design and Architecture from Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY. He holds a BA in Art and German from Wabash College, Crawfordsville, IN. Matthew lives with his wife, artist Rossana Martinez, and son Mateo in Brooklyn, NY.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Shuffle (for Le Corbusier), 2014
Acrylic on panel
8 x 8 inches

posted November 08, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , ,

Matthew Deleget at Peter Blake Gallery

Matthew Deleget, Vanitas (Black), 2014, Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame, diptych, 19.25 x 15.25 x 1.5 inches each, 19.25 x 32.5 x 1.5 inches overall

Matthew Deleget at Peter Blake Gallery
By Mariangeles Soto-Diaz
Artpulse
No. 19, Volume 5, 2014, p. 82
www.artpulsemagazine.com

Matthew Deleget’s new show at the Peter Blake Gallery, titled “Vanitas,” replaces his usual historical creations with a series of monochrome paintings made with enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frames. By uniformly spraying both canvas and frame to create a seamless unity, Deleget literally and figuratively makes visible the role of the frame. What kinds of frames — statements, institutions, criticism — are necessary in the constitution of an artwork’s ontology? Questions of conceptual framing and painting’s ontology are indispensable to monochrome painting’s ongoing history, and in “Vanitas,” Deleget engages some of the ideas expressed through the genre.

All nine of the medium-sized monochrome paintings subscribe to the same formula, though each work elicits a different set of associations. Vanitas (Bright Gold) features the most ostentatious of the frames, working as a shorthand for excess and the material displays we associate with the historical genre of vanitas. Using semantic rather than illustrative means, Vanitas (Bright Gold) steers the focus toward matters of taste and tastelessness, tempering the shorthand for material excesses with the light moral undertone that characterizes the genre. There is no explicit manifestation of material wealth, but Deleget’s elaborate gold frame against the austerity of monochrome painting make for a surprisingly brilliant tension. In contrast, Vanitas (Pewter Gray), features the least decorative of the frames in the exhibition. The dense, flat gray of this work highlights the painted nail holes and ridges of the wooden frame’s dents, recalling Deleget’s own hammered paintings.

The unpretentiousness of Vanitas (Pewter Gray) has the odd familiarity of unfixed yet periodically repainted wooden floors. Also echoing architecture, Vanitas (Dover White) distances itself from the cool white monochromes by Malevich, Ryman or Rauschenberg through its moderately ornate frame whose warmth vaguely recalls middle-class living room walls with baseboard moldings. The white monochrome fills the trope of silence in reductive abstraction, calling into question the border separating meaning from potential meaninglessness, and yet this articulation is deftly thwarted by Deleget’s noncompliant decorative frame—the empty vessel might not be empty after all.

Deleget’s primary color monochromes — Vanitas (Ford Blue), Vanitas (Sun Yellow) and especially Vanitas (Tomato) — animate the exhibition, infusing the entire show with an offbeat take on primaries. Finally, Vanitas (Black) is repeated in the show (one solo, two as diptych) and feels closer to Allan McCollum’s Plaster Surrogate paintings than to Reinhardt’s sublime monochromes. If the black monochrome stands for the tired cliché of painting’s ongoing death, here its declarative power is recast as a symbol of ephemerality.

While Deleget’s exhibition might be interpreted as a metaphor for painting’s condition, it is neither dry nor cynical. “Vanitas” makes visible the need for visual and intellectual pleasure modulated by a humorous dose of subversion, as well as the underlying imperative of slowing down the fast rhythm of obsolescence. And that may just be the key to abstract painting’s viability, at least for now. All is vanity.

Mariangeles Soto-Diaz is an artist who lives and works in Southern California. Her writing has been published in Contemporary Aesthetics, Postcolo- nial Studies and other academic journals.

Image:
Matthew Deleget, Vanitas (Black), 2014
enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame, diptych
19.25 x 15.25 x 1.5 inches each

posted November 07, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , ,

Politics and Abstract Painting: Matthew Deleget at Outlet

Matthew Deleget, Death Benefit, 2014, Gold enamel spray paint on wooden panels, diptych, 24 x 43 inches overall, 24 x 20 inches each

Politics and Abstract Painting: Matthew Deleget at Outlet
By Sharon Butler
Two Coats of Paint
October 1, 2014
www.twocoatsofpaint.com

In the beginning, when Malevich and El Lissitzky were making some of the first Western abstract paintings, abstraction was infused with politics and ideas. The connection continued through European art movements in the 1960s and 1970s, such as Arte Povera, ZERO Group, and Supports/Surfaces. In recent years, however, abstract form and process have become vehicles for more personal, less strident explorations of the provisional, the contingent and the casual.

These days, a painting often starts with a small idea about everyday life–a nasty break-up, for instance–that might incidentally be read as a metaphor for a larger, more universal issue or argument even though the connection may be completely unintended. Nonetheless, I’ve always taken the position that individual artists’ widespread adoption of these approaches is, in itself, an indication of our deep and pervasive social problems, regardless of the artists’ intents.

Recently in the studio I’ve begun to turn my own thinking around. I’ve resolved to look at the specific challenges and personal circumstances that form the impetus for each painting as symptoms of larger problems within our society. The problems then become the explicit basis for each painting, rather than simply an inadvertent or unconscious reference. Instead of using process and materiality as metaphor, I want to reinvigorate the notion that abstract paintings can in fact be directly engaged with the world. In his remarkable paintings currently on display at Outlet, Matthew Deleget seems to be thinking along the same lines.

The co-director of Minus Space, Deleget has never been particularly interested in traditional painting approaches such as wet-on-wet and glazing, color mixing, or other techniques that create the illusion of three dimensionality. Resolutely reductive, his practice is to make pristine, mid-size wooden panels and cover them with spray paint. For this series, he has done a little more, with a big impact. To wit, he has struck the surface of each painting with a small hammer until the smooth panel is pockmarked and sometimes destroyed. For many artists, such gestures would be violent acts rooted in personal frustration, but Deleget connects it with something larger. His intent is to create a visual equivalent to the damage US intervention has caused in Middle East countries, and he has succeeded quite elegantly. Improbably for a reductive artist, Deleget prompts us to vault past esoteric issues in contemporary abstraction to big issues in today’s world.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Death Benefit, 2014
Gold enamel spray paint on wooden panels, diptych
24 x 43 inches overall, 24 x 20 inches each

posted October 04, 2014 | Comments (0)

To Leo, a Tribute at Sideshow Gallery

Matthew Deleget, Shuffle (for Felix Pupi Legarreta), 2010, Acrylic on MDF, colors chosen at random, 18 x 18 inches, Private collection, New York

To Leo, a Tribute at Sideshow Gallery
By Paul Corio
On-Verge
September 17, 2014
www.on-verge.org

“…Matthew Deleget’s system-based Shuffle (2010) presented something tantamount to four monochromes trying to exist within the same space, each jostling out the other. Focusing on any one of the painting’s four sets of four colors called them up to the foreground, only to be superseded by another with a shift in gaze…”

Image:
Matthew Deleget, Shuffle (for Felix Pupi Legarreta), 2010
Acrylic on MDF, colors chosen at random, 18 x 18 inches
Private collection, New York

posted September 22, 2014 | Comments (0)

Matthew Deleget: False Positive

Matthew Deleget studio view, 2014

Matthew Deleget: False Positive
Outlet
253 Wilson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11237
www.outletbk.com
September 13 – October 5, 2014
Opening: Saturday, September 13, 7-10pm

Outlet Fine Art is pleased to present False Positive, new paintings by Matthew Deleget. Opening reception will be held Saturday, September 13 from 7-10pm. Exhibition will continue with gallery hours Saturday and Sunday 12-6pm or by appointment by calling 646-361-8512 through October 5.

Fresh from the 2014 Whitney Biennial, Matthew Deleget is deeply committed to a pluralistic approach. In his studio, he merges painting with conceptual, process, and installation strategies. For him, it is important to make work in the most direct, matter-of-fact manner possible — no novelties, gimmicks, or tricks. He is more interested in the idea of painting than the process. Paint is applied as if painting a fence, color is used straight out of the tube. He is decidedly unromantic about this process. It is all a means to an end. For his exhibition at Outlet, Deleget will feature a suite of new broken-panel monochrome paintings informed by the recent events of the Arab Spring and the United States’ unsustainable militaristic policies in the Middle East over the past decade. The paintings are made of industrial enamel spray paint on wooden panels that are then repeatedly hit with a hammer until the meticulous surfaces are splintered apart and broken open.

Image:
Matthew Deleget studio view, 2014

posted September 02, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , ,

Summer Formal

Summer Formal, Peter Blake Gallery, Laguna Beach, CA; Matthew Deleget

Summer Formal
Selected Works by Gallery Artists
Peter Blake Gallery
435 Ocean Avenue
Laguna Beach, CA 92651
www.peterblakegallery.com
August 7 – September 13, 2014

posted August 21, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , ,

Matthew Deleget, Hadi Tabatabai, Don Voisine at Peter Blake Gallery

Matthew Deleget, Vanitas (Tomato), 2014, Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame, 22.5 x 26.5 x 3.5 inches, Private collection, Los Angeles, CA

Matthew Deleget, Hadi Tabatabai, Don Voisine at Peter Blake Gallery
By Liz Goldner
Art Ltd.
July/August 2014
www.artltdmag.com

“One of Laguna’s most successful gallerists, Peter Blake shifted focus three years ago, from mostly LA-based artists, to artists working in a reductive, minimalist style, including numerous artists from way beyond Southern California. His recent three-person exhibition highlighted two artists currently based in Brooklyn — Matthew Deleget and Don Voisine — and one from the Bay Area, Hadi Tabatabai. Matthew Deleget, whose work was included this spring in the 2014 Whitney Biennial, created a nine work series called Vanitas for this show. Taking nine enamel spray paint colors — black, sun yellow, pewter, red, gold, true blue, Dover White, bright yellow and Ford Blue — he then monochromatically spray-painted each canvas and its surrounding ultra-baroque frame with one of these colors. The result is nine paintings that echo in form, structure, and even simplicity of subject matter, the Dutch 16th-17th century “vanitas” still-life paintings. Conversely, the effect of each work, with its nearly neon splash of single color, is a mesmerizing in-your-face challenge to traditional painting. The artist’s inspiration for the series also includes Mondrian’s paintings and monochromatic works by the 1970s-80s “Radical Painting Group”…”

Image:
Matthew Deleget, Vanitas (Tomato), 2014
Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame, 22.5 x 26.5 x 3.5 inches
Private collection, Los Angeles, CA

posted August 01, 2014 | Comments (0)

Nuevos diálogos y tentativas en Alejandra von Hartz

Installation view of New Dialogues, Alejandra von Hartz Gallery, Miami, FL, 2014

Nuevos diálogos y tentativas en Alejandra von Hartz
By Janet Batet
El Nuevo Herald
Miami, FL
July 5, 2014
www.elnuevoherald.com

“…También se incluye en este grupo, Dead before Death, 2012, de Deleget, quien se reapropia del título del conocido soneto de la poeta inglesa Christina Rossetti. El dorado tríptico alude también a la sagrada familia y a la noción de poder, pero, por sobre todo, asistimos a una metáfora del arte contemporáneo y su reducción a mero valor monetario condicionando así su existencia incluso desde la concepción de la pieza…”

Image:
Installation view of New Dialogues, Alejandra von Hartz Gallery, Miami, FL, 2014

posted July 07, 2014 | Comments (0)

Vault Series: Jam II

Matthew Deleget, Shuffle (for Roberto Roena), 2010, Acrylic on MDF, colors chosen at random, 18 x 18 inches

Vault Series: Jam II
Curated by Joan Backes
New Bedford Art Museum
New Bedford, MA
www.newbedfordartmuseum.org
June 27 – September 12, 2014

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Shuffle (for Roberto Roena), 2010
Acrylic on MDF, colors chosen at random
18 x 18 inches

posted June 02, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , ,

The First Downtown Fair, An Intimate Art Fair

Matthew Deleget, Peter Blake Gallery, Downtown Fair, New York, May 2014

The First Downtown Fair, An Intimate Art Fair
By Nicole Murakami
Whitewall Magazine
May 13, 2014
www.whitewallmag.com/art/the-first-downtown-fair-an-intimate-art-fair

“…The Peter Blake Gallery displayed an elegant collection of work. Each piece could be considered minimalistic from a distance, until examining the intricate details. The curation included various artists, and the range demonstrated the gallery’s clear vision. One of the chosen pieces was Matthew Deleget’s Oooo, Oooo, Oooo, three wooden pink frames that were hit by a hammer; the actions are specified within the description to highlight the importance and meaning behind the creation process…”

Image:
Installation view of Peter Blake Gallery booth
Downtown Fair, NYC, May 2014
(l to r) Maria Elena Gonzalez, Matthew Deleget, Lita Albuquerque, Charles Arnoldi, Stephanie Bachiero, Matt McClune, Don Voisine

posted May 15, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Artists on the Whitney Biennial

Biennial artist Matthew Deleget (left) with artist David Diao, in front of his installation Zero-Sum, 2014, at the opening of the 2014 Whitney Biennial, Photo: Rossana Martinez

Artists on the Whitney Biennial
By Sara Schnadt
Artbound / KCET
May 8, 2014
www.kcet.org/arts/artbound/counties/whitney-biennial-artists.html

“The Whitney Biennial, a bi-annual survey exhibition of up-and-coming artists from across the U.S., based at the Whitney Museum in New York, is one of the most visible and respected art exhibitions in the States. From its beginnings in 1932 as a painting and sculpture exhibition, to its incorporation of a wide range of media by the 1970′s, to its periodic venue additions (including public spaces, Central Park, and, in 2008 the Park Avenue Armory to show large-scale performance and installation), the Biennial has had a goal of encapsulating the current moment in contemporary art. Many artists who have been invited to participate have gone on to fame, some to commercial success, and many have become part of a substantive ongoing dialogue around the meaning and implications of contemporary art.

Yet, the biennial has struggled to retain its identity. No one show can now encapsulate the contemporary moment, it seems. After all, the centers of the art world have become more international, and geographically distributed while artists have become more mobile, and self-directed in defining their models for production. The forms and contexts of conversations within contemporary art have become increasingly hybrid and diverse over the past few years as well.”

Continue reading

Image:
Biennial artist Matthew Deleget (left) with artist David Diao, in front of his installation Zero-Sum, 2014, at the opening of the 2014 Whitney Biennial
Photo: Rossana Martinez

posted May 08, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , ,

Peter Blake Gallery @ Downtown Fair, May 8-11

Matthew Deleget, Oooo Oooo Oooo, 2014, Spray paint on wooden panel, hit with a hammer, triptych, 40 x 104 inches overall, each panel, 40 x 30 inches

Peter Blake Gallery
Booth DT15
Downtown Fair
Downtown Armory
68 Lexington Avenue @ 25th Street
New York, NY
www.downtownfair.com
May 8-11, 2014
Hours: Thursday 5-9pm, Friday-Saturday 12-8pm, Sunday 12-6pm

I’m excited to be exhibiting with Peter Blake Gallery at the inaugural Downtown Fair! I’ll be showing a new broken panel triptych — Oooo Oooo Oooo (2014) — the largest I’ve made to-date and the first where I broke the panel first and then painted it.

In addition to my work, Peter is presenting a terrific survey of East and West Coast geometric, monochrome, and conceptual abstraction. Artists include Lita Albuquerque, Charles Arnoldi, Stephanie Bachiero, Steve Burtch, Alan Ebnother, Maria Elena Gonzalez, Joe Goode, Marcia Hafif, Scot Heywood, Matt McClune, Ed Moses, Gregg Renfrow, Robert Sagerman, Hadi Tabatabai, Don Voisine, Jan Maarten Voskuil, and John Zinsser.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Oooo Oooo Oooo, 2014
Spray paint on wooden panel hit with a hammer, triptych
40 x 104 inches overall, each panel 40 x 30 inches

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Matthew Deleget: Vanitas

Matthew Deleget, Vanitas (Tomato Red), 2014, Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame, 22.5 x 26.5 x 3.5 inches

Matthew Deleget: Vanitas
Peter Blake Gallery
435 Ocean Avenue
Laguna Beach, CA 92651
www.peterblakegallery.com
April 26 – May 31, 2014
Opening: Saturday, April 26, 6-8pm

I’m delighted to announce my upcoming solo exhibition Vanitas at Peter Blake Gallery in Laguna Beach, California. The exhibition opens this Saturday, April 26, 6-8pm and will be on view through May 31.

I will be presenting a suite of new monochrome paintings made of enamel spray paint on canvas and highly decorative frames. The works fuse painting and its formal presentation into a single visual experience and examine perceived issues of taste and authority within the theater of an exhibition space.

These works were specifically informed by Dutch vanitas/still life painting of the 16th-17th centuries, Piet Mondrian’s neoplastic paintings from the 1920s-1940s, and the Radical Painting Group active in NYC during the 1970s-1980s.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Vanitas (Tomato Red), 2014
Enamel spray paint on canvas and decorative frame
22.5 x 26.5 x 3.5 inches

posted April 26, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , ,

Fiction (with only daylight between us)

Matthew Deleget, Nuclear Error, 2014, Black and white xerox, 11 x 8.5 inches

Fiction (with only daylight between us)
Curated by Jeffrey Cortland Jones
No Future Projects & University of Dayton
Dayton, OH
Opens May 1, 2014

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Nuclear Error, 2014
Black and white xerox
11 x 8.5 inches

posted April 25, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , ,

Artist Flashcards: Matthew Deleget and his Deconstructive Paintings

Matthew Deleget, Bushwick Daily

Artist Flashcards: Matthew Deleget and his Deconstructive Paintings
By Danielle Kalamaras
Bushwick Daily
April 2, 2014
www.bushwickdaily.com

Each week Bushwick Daily brings you a new Artist FlashCard, introducing an amazing artist living/working/showing in Bushwick who you need to know. Featuring both new and old faces, our goal is to encourage the growth of art scene and to appreciate wonderful talent in our hood!

Who: Matthew Deleget

Where: He originally moved to New York City to do graduate work in painting and art history at Pratt Institute. Since then, he lived in a bunch of different neighborhoods, including Clinton Hill, Carroll Gardens, and now Boerum Hill. He has had studios in Clinton Hill, Carroll Gardens, Gowanus, and Dumbo.

What: Works ranging in style and medium, yet connected through their analytical and physical deconstruction of painting in order to expand the possibilities of the medium. By reconstructing the composition, he moves beyond the confines of the stretcher bars to the far reaches of the walls and the exhibition space.

Where you have seen his work: Most notably he has a piece in the 2014 Whitney Biennial (no big!), while locally he is in the group show Spitball at Storefront Ten Eyck (up through April 6) that deals with the subject of humor along the absurdist lines of Andy Kaufman. He is also in a group show of MFA alumni at Pratt Institute, which was organized by Polina Barskaya, Alexander Kaluzhsky, Jesse Patrick Martin, and Bryan Rogers of Bushwick staple gallery Honey Ramka. Matthew will be staying busy this year with a solo show at Peter Blake in Laguna Beach, CA later this month, a show at the New Bedford Art Museum in Massachusetts this summer, and he will be in a two-person show this fall with artist Hartmut Böhm at Dr. Julius / AP in Berlin, Germany.

Why we’re into it: Matthew Deleget is an artist tour-de-force to keep your eyes on. His work focuses on the deconstruction of the canvas, yet he explained his technique as moving through different strategies that push the boundaries of painting to its limits. Of his work he says, ”some of my strategies include monochrome paintings that are broken with a hammer, paintings that are made on-site in a show where I hang a canvas on the wall and then spray paint it and the wall at the same time, paintings that are made by random color and pattern generation, paintings that are made of plastic bags as a surrogate for paint, etc. I’m interested in the possibility in painting.”

Working in so many styles drove me to asking Matthew his influences. He is influenced by the people around him and those that have touched his life, starting with his grandfather who taught him how to paint, to the artists he works with and collaborates at his gallery Minus Space which he co-founded in 2003 with his wife, artist Rossana Martinez, based in Dumbo, Brooklyn. The artist’s biggest influence without a doubt is his wife, artist Rossana Martinez , who he met at Pratt in 1994. As the artists described, “She lived next door to me in the dorm my first semester – the girl next door – and we’ve been sharing everything ever since.” With art and life so intertwined, Matthew Deleget’s prolific career has only just begun.

posted April 09, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: ,

Michelle Grabner’s Whitney Biennial is a Grand “Curriculum”

Matthew Deleget, Zero-Sum, 2014, 2014 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art

Michelle Grabner’s Whitney Biennial is a Grand “Curriculum”
By Mary Louise Schumacher
Journal Sentinel
March 14, 2014
www.jsonline.com (full article)

“…Down in the basement near the museum’s cafe is a particularly wonderful gesture by Matthew Deleget, who instead of contributing a painting, installed a vitrine with a gathering of seminal books on art and theory that he bought on the cheap, a stand-in for the ideas that individuals and institutions have discarded. Like Michelle’s show, it’s a rescuing and relishing of ideas.

And you see this theory pinging around the show. It is re-animated by a cacophony of wonderful, artist-to-artist conversations that recur and overlap in every corner of the show. It continues, too, in written form in the exhibition catalogue…”

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Zero-Sum (detail), 2011-present
42 discounted & discarded art publications, vitrine
Site-specific installation for the Whitney Museum
Dimensions variable

posted March 15, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , ,

Top 10 Artists to Watch at the Whitney Biennial

Matthew Deleget, Zero Sum, 2014 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art

Top 10 Artists to Watch at the Whitney Biennial
By David Everitt Howe
ARTPHAIRE
March 7, 2014
www.artphaire.com/top-10-artists-watch-2014-whitney-biennial

The 2014 Whitney Biennial opens today with three outside curators, Stuart Comer, Anthony Elms and Michelle Grabner sharing programming of this prestigious spring show. We’ve dug deep to highlight ten of the 103 artists we think you should look out for on your visit.

Matthew Deleget (#6)
Making painting something of a contact sport, Matthew Deleget’s canvases are beat with a hammer, literally, wrapped in rolls of brightly colored masking tape, or simply spray painted directly on the wall. The result is their monochromatic color bleeds onto the gallery wall, and playfully subvert the medium in strikingly beautiful ways…

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Zero-Sum (detail), 2011-present
42 discounted & discarded art publications, vitrine
Site-specific installation for the Whitney Museum
Dimensions variable

posted March 08, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , ,

2014 Whitney Biennial II

2014 Whitney Biennial II
By Loren Munk
The Kalm Report
March 7, 2014

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Spitball

Matthew Deleget, Oooo Oooo Oooo, 2014, Spray paint on wooden panel, hit with a hammer, triptych, 40 x 104 inches overall, each panel, 40 x 30 inches

Spitball
Curated by Progress Report
Storefront Ten Eyck
324 Ten Eyck Street
Brooklyn, NY 11206
www.storefrontteneyck.com
March 8 – April 6, 2014
Opening: Saturday, March 8, 6-9 pm

Participating Artists:
Joshua Abelow, Inna Babaeva, Brian Belott, Amanda Browder, Ernesto Burgos, Andy Cross, Matthew Deleget, Valerie Hegarty, Christopher K. Ho, Grant Huang, Jamian Juliano-Villani, John O’Connor, Sara Greenberger Rafferty, Erik Schoonebeek, Adam Parker Smith

Storefront Ten Eyck and Progress Report are proud to present Spitball, a group exhibition that brings together various ways in which comedy manifests itself in the studio practice and is translated into art-making strategies. These artists cross categorical boundaries through material and absurdist content by creating the visual equivalent of what goes into the writing and delivery of a really good joke. By turning familiar expectations on their head, the exhibition looks at parallels behind what makes work that garners a genuine reaction by articulating the ridiculous subject at hand.

About Progress Report:
Progress Report is an independent artist initiative founded by Kris Chatterson and Vince Contarino in 2010. PR was originally started as an online platform dedicated to artist features by showing studio works-in-progress and offering conversations around the creative process.

It has since developed into a curatorial project that seeks to make connections through diverse modes of art making by finding common threads in work borne of a challenging and rigorous practice. Past exhibitions include, The Working Title, a 32-artist survey of abstraction at the Bronx River Arts Center, and Ritual Aesthetics, presented at Tompkins Projects in Brooklyn.

About the gallery:
Storefront Ten Eyck is directed by artist Deborah Brown. The mission of the gallery is to show the work of emerging Bushwick artists and to revisit the work of established artists. From 2009-13, the space was called Storefront Bushwick. In October 2013, the gallery relocated to a former factory building in East Williamsburg/Bushwick. The neighborhood is a thriving arts community and home to 50 galleries, many run by artists.

Deborah Brown is an artist, curator and Bushwick gadfly. She is a board member of NURTUREart, BRIC Artist Advisory Council and Community Board #4 in Bushwick where she serves as chair of the Arts and Culture Committee. Her work is represented by Lesley Heller Workspace.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Oooo Oooo Oooo, 2014
Spray paint on wooden panel, hit with a hammer, triptych
40 x 104 inches overall, each panel, 40 x 30 inches copy

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Spitball

Spitball, Progress Report, Storefront Ten Eyck, Matthew Deleget

Spitball
Curated by Progress Report
Storefront Ten Eyck
324 Ten Eyck Street
Brooklyn NY 11206
www.storefrontteneyck.com
March 8 – April 6, 2014
Opening: Saturday, March 8, 6-9pm

Participating Artists:
Joshua Abelow, Inna Babaeva, Brian Belott, Amanda Browder, Ernesto Burgos, Andy Cross, Matthew Deleget, Valerie Hegarty, Christopher K. Ho, Grant Huang, Jamian Juliano-Villani, John O’Connor, Sara Greenberger Rafferty, Erik Schoonebeek, Adam Parker Smith

Storefront Ten Eyck and Progress Report are proud to present Spitball, a group exhibition that brings together various ways in which comedy manifests itself in the studio practice and is translated into art making strategies. These artists cross categorical boundaries through material and absurdist content by creating the visual equivalent of what goes into the writing and delivery of a really good joke. By turning familiar expectations on their head, the exhibition looks at parallels behind what makes work that garners a genuine reaction by articulating the ridiculous subject at hand.

About Progress Report:
Progress Report) is an independent artist initiative founded by Kris Chatterson and Vince Contarino in 2010. PR was originally started as an online platform dedicated to artist features by showing studio works-in-progress and offering conversations around the creative process. It has since developed into a curatorial project that seeks to make connections through diverse modes of art making by finding common threads in work borne of a challenging and rigorous practice. Past exhibitions include, The Working Title, a 32-artist survey of abstraction at the Bronx River Arts Center, and Ritual Aesthetics, presented at Tompkins Projects in Brooklyn.

www.progress-report.org

posted March 07, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Whitney Biennial Hits the Books

Matthew Deleget, Zero-Sum, 2011-present, 42 discounted & discarded art publications, vitrine, Site-specific installation for the Whitney Museum, Dimensions variable

Whitney Biennial Hits the Books
by Pac Pobric
The Art Newspaper
March 2014

Publishing is a theme this year of the sprawling survey of contemporary art

New York. Critics have not always been kind to the Whitney Biennial, which opens its latest edition in New York this month. In 1946, when it was still an annual event, the essayist Clement Greenberg began his review by saying that it was “no worse than last year’s— which amounts almost to an improvement, since each of the Annuals in the three or four years previous had been worse than the one before it”. Around 40 years later, Robert Hughes saw the work of the 1985 show’s youngest artists as “loud and, except in its careerism, invincibly dumb”. The 1993 edition, an unabashedly political one, included work by Daniel Joseph Martinez, who distributed badges to museum-goers that read: “I can’t imagine ever wanting to be white”. In the New York Times that year, Michael Kimmelman said he presumed that “many have left the biennial, as I have, feeling battered by condescension”. And even before the 2014 edition opened, it had its detractors. The Huffington Post, for example, groaned that the show did not include enough minorities or women.

But this year’s biennial is difficult to pin down. With 103 participants, it is not the largest show in its history (the 1973 edition, for example, included 221), but its artists span the aesthetic gamut: painters, sculptors, performers, photographers, novelists, poets, appropriation artists and even one publishing house, Semiotext(e). Age does not bring the artists together either. The youngest two, Tony Lewis and Jacolby Satterwhite, each turn 28 this year, as the oldest, Etel Adnan, celebrates her 89th birthday. And although the show is being organised by three curators (Michelle Grabner, Anthony Elms and Stuart Comer), some of the artists involved are using the work of other artists in their own practice.

Can a show this sprawling amount to much more than a broad survey of contemporary art? “When it comes down to it, that is what it is,” Elms says, adding that any curatorial idea for the biennial is “loose, and I would be hard pressed to say that the artists I chose stay close to a line I might give”. But publishing is a theme that carries throughout: one of the artists she has chosen is the late American author David Foster Wallace, who will be represented by two research notebooks used in the preparation of his unfinished, posthumous 2011 novel The Pale King.

The theme is not restricted to novelists. For his part in the show, the artist Matthew Deleget has constructed a 20ft-long vitrine filled with books purchased at museum bookstores at discounted prices. In many instances, the books are on artists seemingly discarded from the art historical narrative. “It’s almost like raising the dead in some cases,” Deleget says.

It is an apt analogy: books speak to us from the past, having already been written. But publications are only one theme among many at this year’s biennial, and the central concern of the curators is that the work speaks for itself, one object at a time.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Zero-Sum, 2011-present
42 discounted & discarded art publications, vitrine
Site-specific installation for the Whitney Museum
Dimensions variable

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David Pagel speaks with Matthew Deleget

Matthew Deleget, Zero-Sum, 2014, 2014 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art

David Pagel speaks with Matthew Deleget
Whitney Biennial 2014 catalog
Whitney Museum of American Art
New York, NY, 2014

David Pagel: I love a bargain as much as the next the guy. And the bargains I love best are books that have been ridiculously discounted and sold for a fraction of what they originally went for. Their prices suggest an alternative economy—one linked to the dominant economy, but absurdly out of synch with its standard operating procedures. As an artist, what led you to choose discounted books as the main materials for Zero Sum [2011-ongoing], your piece in this year’s Whitney?

Matthew Deleget: Like much of the work I’ve been making lately, I didn’t really intend to make Zero Sum at all. The piece just kind of occurred to me in looking more closely at my own interests and habits—the things I do unconsciously when researching and making the things I make. I do love discount books. (I’ve got a bit of a problem, actually.) I especially like the rare, vintage, and out-of-print ones I find in used bookstores, which are sadly becoming increasingly rare in New York. Two of the remaining ones in my neighborhood in downtown Brooklyn just became nail salons. I don’t even want to think about what that implies about the state of intellectual discourse right now.

For the last two decades, I’ve been combing through bins at second-hand stores, galleries, and museums for cool finds. Around five years ago, it struck me, though, that most of the books I’m interested in, either intellectually or aesthetically, have been either discounted or discarded in various ways by institutions, galleries, schools, or individuals. I can remember the precise moment this occurred to me, in fact. I was giving a talk at a local art school, and I came across the landmark book (for me) Circle: An International Survey of Constructive Art, edited by J.L. Martin, Ben Nicholson, and Naum Gabo, being used as a doorstop. Of course, this book is resting safely at home with me now. It joined my collection of hundreds of monographs, artists’ writings, biographies, and art-history publications—my personal resource library and a latent work of art unto itself.

DP: And does your interest in cheap, discontinued publications tell us much about the way you think of—and run—the gallery MINUS SPACE?

MD: Yes, in many ways, Zero Sum and MINUS SPACE, which I cofounded in 2003 with my wife, artist Rossana Martínez, address the same basic issue. Both advocate for artists and ideas that I feel are extraordinary, but that are generally overlooked, unfashionable, unmarketable, or, worst, discounted altogether. As artists, we make unbelievable sacrifices to produce our work with the idea that we may, hopefully someday, be included in books like these. By thinking of these books as works of art, I’ve brought them back full circle into the realm of ideas and aesthetics. I wonder just how long it will be before I see this Whitney Biennial catalog in a discount bin somewhere . . .

DP: And, if we’re lucky, there’ll be some bargain-conscious, history-loving youngster ready to snatch it up and do something interesting with it? To rescue it from the dustbin of history? Is Zero Sum a kind of rescue operation? And doesn’t that idea collide with the work’s title, which implies a perfect balancing out of accounts? It seems to me that your work suggests that the accounts are not balanced, that there is a remainder, and that that is where the surplus value comes in. Is that where art enters the picture?

MD: It’s so much more provocative to think of Zero Sum as a kind of rescue operation! Yes, I do think advocacy is a big part of it, working to set at least one facet of the record straight. As you know, I have a background in both painting and art history—I really don’t see any distinction between the two. I’m terribly dissatisfied, however, with the history of contemporary art as it’s been told in the glossies, mega-galleries, art fairs, museums, and auction houses over the past two decades. It’s history as told by the “winners,” in a way, by the 1 percent at the top end of the market.

By contrast, I find the plodding investigation of new ideas and forms, which primarily takes place inside artists’ studios, to be much more compelling. It’s messy, irrational, unregulated, pluralistic, even contradictory. I prefer visiting a studio over seeing a formal exhibition of an artist’s work any day. For me, seeing work in the space in which it’s been conceived and labored over has just no comparison. My real interest lies not in the theatricality of a show, but in that massive part of the iceberg that sits below the surface of the water and generally doesn’t see the light of day. That’s the part that keeps the rest of the fray afloat.

DP: Could you say more about the ways your backgrounds in painting and art history have fed into each other? How does that double-layered approach influence the many roles you play today—painter, curator, dealer, archivist, and historian? And does this suggest that amateurism, after years of disparagement from paid professionals, is making a comeback?

MD: I think my studio work and the work I do at the gallery are one in the same. It’s honestly impossible for me to distinguish where one ends and the other begins. I’m an artist at the gallery and a historian in the studio. When I’m not physically at one place, I’m at the other. And I try to approach both with the same level of intensity and criticality.

I don’t think of it so much as amateurism, but rather as DIY. And much of the art world as it currently exists—the things we genuinely take for granted now—was started in this same DIY manner by artists. Look no further than the Whitney Museum itself. Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, an established sculptor, founded the Whitney Studio Club in 1918 to support the work of her artist friends and colleagues. She also collected their work intensively, and later on offered her enormous collection—something like five hundred works or more—to the Met in 1929. When the Met rejected it, the Whitney was born.

I think our discourse would be a lot less interesting if we left it up to the professionals. I think the pros would agree with me. Meaningful things can happen when people start to question the status quo, envision how things could be different, and take matters into their own hands. I’m an ally of anyone who does this.

David Pagel is an art critic who lives in Los Angeles. He writes regularly for the Los Angeles Times, and is a professor of art theory and history at Claremont Graduate University and an adjunct curator at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, New York.

posted March 01, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2014 Whitney Biennial

Matthew Deleget, Whitney Biennial, Photograph by Ed Lederman

2014 Whitney Biennial
Curated by Stuart Comer, Anthony Elms & Michelle Grabner
Whitney Museum of American Art
945 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10025
www.whitney.org
March 7 – May 25, 2014

The 2014 Whitney Biennial will take a bold new form as three curators from outside the Museum—Stuart Comer (Chief Curator of Media and Performance Art at MoMA), Anthony Elms (Associate Curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia), and Michelle Grabner (artist and Professor in the Painting and Drawing Department at the School of the Art Institute, Chicago)—each oversee one floor, representing a range of geographic vantages and curatorial methodologies.

Donna De Salvo, Chief Curator and Deputy Director for Programs at the Whitney, noted: “The 2014 Biennial brings together the findings of three curators with very distinct points of view. There is little overlap in the artists they have selected and yet there is common ground. This can be seen in their choice of artists working in interdisciplinary ways, artists working collectively, and artists from a variety of generations. Together, the 103 participants offer one of the broadest and most diverse takes on art in the United States that the Whitney has offered in many years.”

This Biennial will be the last to take place in the Whitney Museum of American Art’s building at 945 Madison Avenue at 75th Street before the Museum moves downtown to its new building in the spring of 2015. This is the 77th in the Museum’s ongoing series of Annuals and Biennials begun in 1932 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney.

Whitney curators Elisabeth Sussman and Jay Sanders, who organized the widely acclaimed 2012 Biennial, will advise on the exhibition.

Participating Artists:
Academy Records and Matt Hanner, Terry Adkins, Etel Adnan, Alma Allen, Ei Arakawa and Carissa Rodriguez, Uri Aran, Robert Ashley and Alex Waterman, Michel Auder, Lisa Anne Auerbach, Julie Ault, Darren Bader, Kevin Beasley, Gretchen Bender, Stephen Berens, Dawoud Bey, Jennifer Bornstein, Andrew Bujalski, Elijah Burgher, Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Véréna Paravel, and Sensory Ethnography Lab, Sarah Charlesworth, Yve Laris Cohen, Critical Practices Inc., Matthew Deleget, David Diao, Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst, Paul Druecke, Jimmie Durham, Rochelle Feinstein, Radamés “Juni” Figueroa, Morgan Fisher, Louise Fishman, Victoria Fu, Gaylen Gerber with David Hammons, Sherrie Levine, and Trevor Shimizu, Jeff Gibson, Tony Greene curated by Richard Hawkins and Catherine Opie, Joseph Grigely, Miguel Gutierrez, Karl Haendel, Philip Hanson, Jong Herschend, Sheila Hicks, Channa Horwitz, HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?, Susan Howe, Jacqueline Humphries, Gary Indiana, Doug Ischar, Carol Jackson, Travis Jeppesen, Alex Jovanovich, Angie Keefer, Ben Kinmont, Shio Kusaka, Chris Larson, Diego Leclery, Zoe Leonard, Tony Lewis, Pam Lins, Fred Lonidier, Ken Lum, Shana Lutker, Dashiell Manley, John Mason, Keith Mayerson, Suzanne McClelland, Dave McKenzie, Bjarne Melgaard, Rebecca Morris, Joshua Mosley, My Barbarian (Malik Gaines, Jade Gordon, and Alexandro Segade), Dona Nelson, Ken Okiishi, Pauline Oliveros, Joel Otterson, Laura Owens, Paul P., taisha paggett, Charlemagne Palestine, Public Collectors, Sara Greenberger Rafferty, Steve Reinke with Jessie Mott, David Robbins, Sterling Ruby, Miljohn Ruperto, Jacolby Satterwhite, Peter Schuyff, Allan Sekula, Semiotext(e), Amy Sillman, Valerie Snobeck and Catherine Sullivan, A.L. Steiner, Emily Sundblad, Ricky Swallow, Tony Tasset, Sergei Tcherepnin, Triple Canopy, Philip Vanderhyden, Pedro Vélez, Charline von Heyl, David Foster Wallace, Dan Walsh, Donelle Woolford, Molly Zuckerman-Hartung

Image:
Whitney Museum of American Art
Photo by Ed Lederman

posted February 25, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , ,

Private View. By Appointment.

Matthew Deleget, Private View By Appointment, Dr. Julius AP, Berlin, Germany

Private View. By Appointment.
Dr. Julius | AP
Leberstrasse 60
D-10829 Berlin
Germany
www.dr-julius.de
February 20 – March 28, 2014
Opening: Tuesday, February 18, 8 pm (on personal invitation only)

Participating Artists
Anette Haas, Annett Zinsmeister, Astrid Schindler, Denise Winter, Don Voisine, Douglas Allsop, Ewerdt Hilgemann, Gilbert Hsiao, Hartmut Bohm, Jan Maarten Voskuil, Jose Heerkens, Peter Weber, Ray Malone, Regine Shumann, Riki Mijling, Sabine Laidig, Siegfried Kreitner, Stephan Ehrenhofer, Susan York, Wolfgang Berndt

posted January 31, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Hard-Edge Abstraction: Paintings and Works on Paper

Matthew Deleget, Shuffle (for Pete El Conde Rodriguez), 2010, Acrylic on MDF, colors chosen at random, 18 x 18 inches

Hard-Edge Abstraction: Paintings and Works on Paper
Curated by Kasarian Dane & Catherine Tedford
The Richard F. Brush Gallery
St. Lawrence University
23 Romoda Drive
Canton, NY
www.stlawu.edu/gallery
January 20 – February 22, 2014

“My first encounter with hard-edge abstraction was as an undergraduate student seeing a large geometric painting by Ellsworth Kelly at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. I remember having a visceral reaction to the primary/secondary/primary colors in Red Green Blue, and the vibrating rectangular edges within the painting made my eyes fatigued from tension. My mind strained to understand the saturated cadmium orange-red against the intense primary green next to the electric blue.

The painting intrigued me, not because I had studied its art historical context or underlying conceptual framework (this important research would come later) or because I was aware of the artist’s intentions at the time, but rather for the powerful sensory experience of simply viewing the painting. Some twenty years later, this experience, and others like it in response to reductive, color-based artwork, continues to fascinate me and influence my practice as an artist and professor of art. One of my courses, Color, which will be offered in the spring of 2014, focuses on chromatic interactions and is based in part on the distinguished work and teaching of Josef Albers.”

–Kasarian Dane, Associate Professor of Art and Art History

Works by the contemporary artists in the exhibition — Kasarian Dane, Ben Grant, Matthew Deleget, Brent Hallard, Gabriele Evertz, and Richard Roth — share certain similar qualities: strong, crisp edges; the interaction of contrasting colors; and clean, decisive execution. Several mid- to late 20th-century prints and works on paper from St. Lawrence University’s permanent collection by Josef Albers, Richard Anuszkiewicz, Herbert Bayer, Ilya Bolotowsky, Allan D’Arcangelo, Bridget Riley and Jack Youngerman are also on display.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Shuffle (for Pete El Conde Rodriguez), 2010
Acrylic on MDF, colors chosen at random
18 x 18 inches

posted January 27, 2014 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

After the Miami Art Fairs: 9 Artists to Watch

Matthew Deleget, Please You, Appease You, 2012, 2 wooden panels hit with a hammer, diptych, 24 x 52 inches overall, each panel 24 x 24 inches

After the Miami Art Fairs: 9 Artists to Watch
Matthew Deleget at Alejandra von Hartz Gallery, Untitled Art Fair
by Jason Andrew
Hyperallergic
December 13, 2013

With his inclusion in the 2014 Whitney Biennial, you can bet Matthew Deleget’s stock is about to spike. A heady curator as well as an accomplished artist, Deleget is the founder of Minus Space. The gallery is the signature platform for reductive art, and Deleget has organized countless solo and group exhibitions. He has collaborated with venues both nationally and internationally. In his own art, Deleget is unromantic about his process remixing theoretical concepts presented by Suprematism, Constructivism, plastic, concrete, Minimal, monochrome, Pattern, Op, neo-geo, radical, and others reductive strategies to create his own extreme case of simplification of form and color.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Please You, Appease You, 2012
Wooden panels hit with a hammer, diptych
24 x 52 inches overall, each panel 24 x 24 inches

posted December 16, 2013 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , ,

20th Anniversary Exhibition

Matthew Deleget, 20th Anniversary Exhibition, Peter Blake Gallery, Laguna Beach, CA, 2013

20th Anniversary Exhibition
Peter Blake Gallery
435 Ocean Avenue
Laguna Beach, CA 92651
www.peterblakegallery.com
June 29 – August 31, 2013
Opening: Saturday, June 29, 5-9pm

posted June 28, 2013 | Comments (0)| Tags: , ,

Matthew Deleget: Ponte Duro / Get Hard

Matthew Deleget, Ponto Duro - Get Hard, Site specific installation, Latex paint on walls, Acrylic paint on MDF, Dimensions variable

Matthew Deleget: Ponte Duro / Get Hard
Curated by Bryan Granger, Knight Curatorial Fellow
Temporary Contemporary
Bass Museum of Art
Miami Beach, FL 33139
www.bassmuseum.org
April 5 – July 12, 2013

Location:
Walgreens Windows
2300 Collins Avenue (corner of 23rd Street)
Miami Beach, FL 33139

With this series of abstract paintings, Brooklyn-based artist Matthew Deleget explores the connections between two seemingly disparate forms of creative output: minimalist painting and salsa music. To determine the title, color palette, and composition for each painting, Deleget used the random Shuffle feature on his iPod and a playlist of songs by the salsa supergroup Fania All Stars. This group originated in the 1960s in New York City, around the same time and place that Minimalism developed. By using the randomness of a shuffled playlist, Deleget is able to remove any semblance of the human gesture, creating work that both adheres to the tradition of minimalism and is informed by the vibrant grooves of the Fania All Stars. In connecting the visual and the sonic, Deleget’s practice extends the synesthetic experiments of early 20th century artists such as Vassily Kandinsky (Russian, 1866-1944) and Arthur Dove (American, 1880-1946), and his work also identifies—both formally and conceptually—with the notable jazz-influenced Broadway Boogie Woogie, 1943, by Piet Mondrian (Dutch, 1872-1944).

Matthew Deleget’s work has been featured internationally, including at MoMA/P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, New York; Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Ithaca, New York; Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art, Indianapolis; Hunter College Times Square Gallery, New York; Alejandra von Hartz Gallery, Miami; and Cress Gallery of Art, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Tennessee, among others. In 2003, along with his wife, artist Rossana Martinez, Deleget founded MINUS SPACE, a gallery dedicated to the contextualization of reductive-based art.

About TC: Temporary Contemporary
TC: Temporary Contemporary is a city-wide temporary, public art program initiated by the Bass Museum of Art in partnership with the City of Miami Beach. This program seeks to activate the urban landscape with art, surprising and engaging residents, visitors and passers-by with outdoor works of art in unexpected places. Sculpture, murals, sound installations, video and other interactive works of art, will interrupt people’s daily routines and encourage thoughtful interactions with the city and its communities. Public art becomes a catalyst to appreciate the unique character of Miami Beach from the Art Deco façade of the Bass Museum to Frank Gehry’s New World Symphony, to the busy streets and boardwalk and the spaces in between.

TC: Temporary Contemporary is an ongoing project, as works of art explore interactions and relationships: to an environment, to a site and to each other. This general theme includes the nuances of communication and interactivity, as well as our physical relationship to architecture. The topography of the city will be pointed to, redrawn and redefined by some projects. Others will convey a sense of surprise via displacement, where seemingly common objects in public space are not what they appear. A number of projects are designed to promote new, vibrant meeting places for social interactions in the community.

Image:
Installation view of Matthew Deleget: Ponte Duro / Get Hard

posted June 10, 2013 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , ,

Selections III: An Exhibition of Art from the UTC Permanent Collection

Matthew Deleget, Color Vulture, 2012

Selections III: An Exhibition of Art from the UTC Permanent Collection
Cress Gallery of Art
The University of Tennessee Chattanooga
Chattanooga, TN
www.cressgallery.org
June 3 – July 26, 2013

An exhibition sponsored in part by the Friends of the Cress Gallery

Gallery Summer hours: 10:00am – 4:00pm Monday through Friday
Closed summer weekends and from July 1 – 5
The Gallery is open to the public. Admission is free.

The UTC Cress Gallery of Art opens its doors Monday June 3 for a summer exhibition offering a fresh and timely selection of seldom seen art from the UTC Permanent Collection. This exhibition will be open throughout freshman and transfer summer orientation to provide our future students and their parents an introduction to the Cress and the visual arts on our Campus.

It’s a colorful exhibition full of light and sound with subject matter from portraits to landscape, from the simple beauty of everyday interiors to ideas of fanciful cricket bats, and from meditative abstractions to the intricacy of finely detailed renderings.

The exhibition contains seventeen works by thirteen artists to include drawings, original artist’s prints, installation, and video. Works range in date of execution from 1923 to 2012. Featured are limited edition prints by prominent 20th Century British artists Patrick Caulfield, Robyn Denny, Patrick Heron, Gordon House, and John Hoyland; renowned Swiss artist Dieter Roth with a portfolio of original prints; a work from the Russian School of Voronezh acquired during a UTC Department of Art / Voronezh College of Art cultural exchange; American artists Daniel Garber, Herbert L. Fink, and those with special ties to UTC: Barry Moser, Ann Poss, Matthew Deleget (Fall 2012 UTC Diane Marek Visiting Artist), and Joseph Shipp (UTC BFA Graphic Design 2006).

Sources include a large gift from the Ackerman Foundation (1980), the UTC Chancellor’s BFA Purchase Award, and many gifts from the artists’ themselves.

Admission to the Cress is free so please don’t hesitate to take a short walk through or two or three; yet plan a longer visit to view these works to their fullest extent. Brief biographical and explanatory texts accompany each work. This exhibition references both the history of art in 20th and 21st Centuries and the place of Chattanooga and UTC within it.

For more information about the Cress Gallery, the UTC Permanent Collection, and the Diane Marek Visiting Artist Series www.cressgallery.org or fB Cress Gallery of Art; or contact ruth-grover@utc.edu voice and text 423-304-9789

The Cress Gallery of Art is located in the lobby of the Fine Arts Center on the UTC campus: 752 Vine Street at the corner of Vine and Palmetto, 37403. Summer visitors may park in the UTC 5th Street Parking garage and take a delightful stroll across our landscaped campus to the Fine Arts Center or obtain a campus lot parking pass at the Administration Bldg on Palmetto Street. Note: parking on streets in the Fortwood area require a Fortwood parking pass. However limited metered and unmetered daytime street parking near the Fine Arts Center is more available during the summer months.

Image:
Matthew Deleget, Color Vulture, 2012
3 off the shelf white canvases, red, yellow, and blue spotlights
Dimensions variable, canvases 24 x 20 inches each
Collection University of Tennessee Chattanooga

posted June 03, 2013 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Matthew Deleget: Ceremony

Matthew Deleget, Nuclear Error, 2012, 25 black plastic 30-gallon garbage bags, hung upside down, static electricity, black pushpins, 165 x 147 inches, Installation view at Cress Gallery of Art / UTC, Chattanooga, TN, 2012

Matthew Deleget: Ceremony
Alejandra von Hartz Gallery
2630 NW 2nd Avenue
Miami, FL 33127
www.alejandravonhartz.net
December 3, 2012 – January 26, 2013
Opening: Monday, December 3, 2012

Alejandra von Hartz Gallery is pleased to present the solo exhibition Matthew Deleget: Ceremony. This is the Brooklyn, New York-based artist’s second exhibition with the gallery and it will feature a suite of new reductive paintings and site-sensitive installations.

The subject of Matthew Deleget’s current work is abstract painting – its historical framework, precedent strategies, exhibition conventions, and audience expectations. In his studio, Matthew takes on a pluralist approach and merges painting with conceptual, process, and installation strategies. He freely samples, remixes, and often subverts precedent abstract art movements, including suprematism, constructivism, plastic, concrete, minimalism, monochrome, pattern, op, neo-geo, radical and others reductive strategies. His work, however, absorbs, digests, and responds to what Matthew sees in his daily environment. This includes “urban culture, corporate government, news propaganda, unwinnable wars, religious fundamentalism, unconscionable materialism, and more”, remarks the artist.

Ceremony, the exhibition’s title, is taken from the first single released by the influential English electronic rock band New Order in 1981. New Order’s members originally made up the seminal post-punk band Joy Division until the suicide of its lead singer Ian Curtis in 1980. New Order was a key artistic influence for Matthew during his youth – he saw the band live in concert countless times – with the song Ceremony signifying both a violent and abrupt artistic and aesthetic end, as well as an uncertain new beginning. Matthew’s exhibition will present primarily monochromatic works in black, white, and gold that characterize this liminal, in-between state and will feature repurposed materials, such as garbage bags, used bricks, screws, and more.

With Ceremony Matthew continues his ongoing investigation into the embedded relationship between abstract painting and music. His first show at the gallery in 2010, Color Climate, included over a dozen randomly-generated color paintings, which were informed by the shuffle function on his iPod. Each painting was named after a member of the legendary ensemble salsa music band Fania All Stars, such as Hector Lavoe, Johnny Pacheco, and Celia Cruz, among others.

In the spring of this year, Matthew was one of two dozen artists included in the landmark exhibition Notations: The Cage Effect Today curated by Joachim Pissarro, Bibi Calderaro, and Julio Grinblatt at Hunter College Times Square Gallery in New York City. The exhibition marked the centennial of John Cage’s birth and examined his diverse and widespread influence on contemporary art throughout America, Asia, Europe, and Latin America.

In September, Matthew was named the Diane Marek Visiting Artist at the University of Tennessee Chattanooga where he mounted the solo exhibition Pictures at an Exhibition (on view through December 7). The title of the exhibition was inspired by the 1874 composition Pictures at an Exhibition written by Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky. Mussorgsky penned his composition after seeing a retrospective exhibition of paintings by his late friend Viktor Hartmann in St. Petersburg, Russia. Interestingly, renowned abstract painter Josef Albers designed an album cover for Command Records’ recording of the composition released in 1961. The album hangs in Matthew’s apartment in Brooklyn.

Matthew Deleget (b. 1972, Hammond, IN; lives Brooklyn, NY) is an abstract painter, curator, and writer. He has exhibited his work nationally and internationally, including solo and group exhibitions in the United States, Europe, and Australasia. Matthew has received awards from the American Academy of Arts & Letters, Brooklyn Arts Council, and The Golden Rule Foundation, and his work has been reviewed in Artforum, The New York Times, Flash Art, Artnet Magazine, The Philadelphia Inquirer, and Basler Zeitung, among others. Matthew is a member of American Abstract Artists and his work is included in private, public, and corporate collections worldwide.

In 2003, Matthew co-founded MINUS SPACE (www.minusspace.com), a platform for reductive art on the international level based in Brooklyn, NY. Since 2006, Matthew has curated more than 40 solo and group exhibitions at both MINUS SPACE’s gallery in Brooklyn, as well as other collaborating venues on the national and international levels. In March, he co-curated the exhibition MINUS SPACE en Oaxaca, which highlighted the work of 31 artists from 10 countries presented across 5 museums in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Matthew holds an MFA in Painting and an MS in Theory, Criticism and History of Art, Design and Architecture from Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY. He holds a BA in Art and German from Wabash College, Crawfordsville, IN.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Nuclear Error, 2012
25 black plastic 30-gallon garbage bags, hung upside down, static electricity, black pushpins
165 x 147 inches
Installation view at Cress Gallery of Art / UTC, Chattanooga, TN, 2012

posted November 23, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Matthew Deleget: Art+Words

Installation view of Matthew Deleget: Pictures at an Exhibition, Cress Gallery of Art, University of Tennessee, 2012

Matthew Deleget: Art+Words
by Rich Bailey
The Pulse: Chattanooga’s Weekly Alternative
November 21, 2012

My first impression of Matthew Deleget’s “Pictures at an Exhibition” (continuing through Dec. 7 at UTC’s Cress Gallery of Art) was that he was an artist speaking narrowly to other artists. But within a few minutes he won me over.

“Softedge” is a wooden panel thickly covered with layer after layer of two-inch blue painter’s tape, 10 rolls to be precise.

“Pleasure Zone” is three rolls of 3/4-inch masking tape hanging on pushpins. Both the rolls and the pins are red, yellow and blue, but the colors alternate.

Those same three rolls seem to have been used in “Note To Self,” a blank 27 x 18-inch sheet taped to the wall with two rows of the same colored tape, from left to right, red-yellow-blue on top and blue-yellow-red on bottom.

“Color Vulture,” the largest piece that dominates the gallery’s back wall, is three off-the-shelf white canvases with red, yellow and blue spotlights playing over them.

OK, I know it’s conceptual art, but it struck me as a collection of distancing gimmicks, as if he were saying “Art is no big deal, I can make it with light. And who needs to paint when you have painter’s tape?”

But then I started reading. Most of Deleget’s pieces are accompanied by long paragraphs of text.

All that blue painter’s tape in “Softedge” not only turns the tool into the medium, it is applied to the surface underneath in a grid, another artist’s tool. Deleget sees subtle color variations that are hard to control, just like with monochrome painting, and “The panel is transformed into a soft billowing pillow of blue by ‘I wonder what would happen if?’ a question that has driven the expansion of thinking in art, technology and science for centuries.”

In “Zero Sum,” Deleget comments on the commodification of art by himself commodifying the work of fellow artists. In this piece, he presents a set of five art books on well-known living abstractionists that he purchased from the sale section of the Whitney Museum of American Art. Like raw materials, these works of abstract art have been packaged into a museum exhibit, manufactured into high-end art books, remaindered to the sale table, then recycled into conceptual art—even more abstract—by Deleget.

“Nuclear Error” is 25 black plastic garbage backs pinned flat to the wall. According to the accompanying text, it is a subversion of “monochrome” painting. Turns out that both black trash bags and the acrylic paint used in monochromes are pigment mixed in a plastic binder. Art = trash bag. And these trash bags are held flush to the wall by static electricity, a benign manifestation of the same atomic particles that filled so many body bags after the nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Fukushima.

These texts are mostly free of the ethereal over-thinking that can be so off putting in artist statements. Reading one of these notes prompts a little “aha” of discovery that makes what might have seemed like an opaque inside joke for artists into something a little richer and more subtle.

True, his work depends on the commentaries for some of its effect, but what doesn’t need accompanying text in these times?

Maybe a beautiful wooded landscape is self-explanatory, but when you drive through the Smoky Mountains, you might want to know why so many trees are dying (acid rain and Wooly Adelgid infestation). Digital devices strive to be self-explaining but most never seem to make it. And are the biggest events of our lives really lived until we tell someone about them?

We talk about everything, so why shouldn’t art come with words attached?

For me the bottom line of good art is that it’s cool stuff from the mind of someone who looks at the world and says, “What can I do with that?” From someone working with clay or paint to a conceptual artist pushing ideas around, artists spend their days attempting to create artifacts or performances that can go out into the world and hold their own next to everything else in the natural and human environments.

Deleget’s exhibition of visual-verbal jabs shares its title with the 1874 musical composition by Modest Mussorgsky, an abstraction of visual art into music that was the only record of the exhibition viewed by the composer. Deleget completes the circuit by showing pictures that embody abstractions and are best viewed by also reading.

“Pictures at an Exhibition” has been reviewed in the current issue of ArtForum, the ninth Cress Gallery show to be reviewed nationally, according to Director-Curator Ruth Grover.

Image:
Installation view of Matthew Deleget: Pictures at an Exhibition, 2012

posted November 21, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , ,

Winter Issue Benefit

Winter Issue, Issue Project Room, Three-Legged Dog, Matthew Deleget, 2012

Winter Issue
Art Lottery and party benefiting ISSUE Project Room featuring a special performance
by Thurston Moore’s Chelsea Light Movingand performance artist Joseph Keckler as MC

Three-Legged Dog
80 Greenwich Street (at Rector Street)
New York, NY
Tuesday, December 4, 2012, 7pm

Art Lottery Tickets $950 ($800 tax-deductible)
75 Artworks – 75 Art Lottery Tickets

Benefit Tickets $250 ($150 tax-deductible)

Art lottery includes works by:
Eleanna Anagnos / Jean-Philippe Antoine / Perry Bard / John Beech / Katherine Bradford / Sarah Braman / Sebastiaan Bremer / Rosanna Bruno / Ken Butler / Sharon Butler / Dawn Clements / Paul Corio / Peggy Cyphers / Mark Dagley / Matthew Deleget / James Esber / Franklin Evans / Gabriele Evertz / Laurie Fendrich / Jane Fine / Rosemarie Fiore / Linda Francis / Kenji Fujita / Joe Fyfe / Allison Gildersleeve / Joanne Greenbaum / Eric Heist / Elana Herzog / Steven Holl / Gilbert Hsiao / David Humphrey / James Hyde / Warren Isensee / Shirley Kaneda / Bill Komoski / Miranda Lichtenstein / Cameron Martin / Chris Martin / Douglas Melini / Andrew Moore / Carrie Moyer / Sam Moyer / Thomas Nozkowski / Carolanna Parlato / Bruce Pearson / Gelah Penn / Joyce Pensato / Tristan Perich / Gary Petersen / Don Porcaro / Sara Greenberger Rafferty / Walter Robinson / David Row / Kevin Ryan / David Scanavino / Karen Schifano / David Shapiro / Ward Shelley / Gary Stephan / Steel Stillman / Josette Urso / Don Voisine / Leslie Wayne / Stephen Westfall / Roger White / Wendy White / Margaret Withers / B. Wurtz + more to be announced soon.

Polymath THURSTON MOORE is best known as a member of Sonic Youth. He is also a tirelessly prolific collaborator and solo artist, as well as the force behind Ecstatic Peace! Records and the recently launched Ecstatic Peace Library. His books include In Silver Rain with a Paper Key (Ecstatic Peace Library), Mix Tape: The Art of Cassette Culture (Universe), and, with Byron Coley, No Wave: Post-Punk. Underground. New York. 1976-1980 (Abrams).

Chelsea Light Moving is a band started by Thurston Moore to play neo-no mantra psyche pummel for free-heads and sweet-minds. Thurston plays electric and 12 string acoustic guitar damage, Samara Lubelski destroys violin and bass notes, Keith Wood rips holes in every guitar, and John Moloney is a beast on skin thump.

Joseph Keckler is a Brooklyn-based musician, writer, raconteur, and performance artist known both for his musical output as well as for creating narrative monologues and collage-like performance and video works, often musical, that involve transformation through multiple characters. His performance pieces and concerts have been presented by The New Museum, SXSW Music, Joe’s Pub, La MaMa ETC, Amsterdam’s Bellevue Theatre, and other venues. Joseph has received residencies from MacDowell and Yaddo and a 2012 NYFA Fellowship in Interdisciplinary Work.

Catering by Lucullan Foods
Drinks designed by David Wondrich

For more information call Matthew Walker: 718-330-0313. Ext. 5

ISSUE Project Room is a pioneering performance center, presenting projects by both emerging and established artists that expand the boundaries of artistic practice. ISSUE plays a vital role in NYC, commissioning more than 20 new works each year that place a special focus on artists whose important contributions to the creative field have been under-recognized, often as a result of gender, sexuality, or geographic location.

Benefit Committee
Karen Auster/ Wendy Blake / Marcus Brauer / Steve Buscemi / Tony Conrad / R. Luke DuBois / Anjali Kumar / John Latona / Robert Longo / Jeanne Lutfy / Stephen Maine / Sam Marwaha / Louise Neri / Brenda Nelson / Andrea Reynosa / Amy Schwartzman /David Wm. Sims / Tom van den Bout / Kevin Vertrees / Steve Wax

ISSUE Board of Directors
Tom van den Bout, Chair / Jeanne Lutfy, Vice Chair / David Wm. Sims, Treasurer / R. Luke DuBois, Secretary / Karen Auster / Marcus Brauer / Steve Buscemi / Tony Conrad / Anjali Kumar / John Latona / Robert Longo / Stephen Maine / Louise Neri / Steve Wax

Artistic Advisory Board
Yoko Ono, Honorary Chair /Jo Andres / Paul Auster / William Basinski / Rhys Chatham / David Grubbs / Shahzad Ismaily / Bob Holman / Jim Jarmusch / John Jesurun / Charlotta Kotik / Zach Layton / Jonathan Lethem / Evan Lurie / John Lurie / Moby / Rick Moody / Stephan Moore / Lawrence D. Morris / Erwin Maas / Julian Schnabel / Elliott Sharp / Danny Simmons / Mark Stewart / Edwin Torres / John Turturro / Kate Valk / Anne Waldman / Hal Willner / Robert Wilson

posted November 20, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , ,

Matthew Deleget: Pictures at an Exhibition

Installation view of Matthew Deleget: Pictures at an Exhibition, Cress Gallery of Art, University of Tennessee Chattanooga, 2012

Matthew Deleget: Pictures at an Exhibition at Cress Gallery of Art
by Sylvie Fortin
Artforum
November 10, 2012

“Pictures at an Exhibition,” Matthew Deleget’s current solo show, features works made with common materials — painter’s tape, drywall screws, garbage bags, paint rollers, pushpins, and spotlights — which modulate walls, canvases, and pedestals to variously delicate, violent, and playful effects, and turn the gallery space into something of a construction zone. In the process, Deleget casts painting as a site-sensitive practice that enlists an expansive repertoire of gestures: wrapping, dipping, hammering, pushing, screwing, floating, flooding, and throwing away.

Deleget mobilizes a restrained palette—red, yellow, and blue; black, white, and gray. Three large yet unmonumental works anchor the main gallery. The entrance-facing wall is awash with Color Vulture (all works 2012), in which three monochrome floor-to-ceiling projections (in red, yellow, and blue) cast painting as event. A store-bought white rectangular canvas hangs hesitantly at the center of each pure-color projection: a reticent star in the hot spot. But stardom is here unsustainable and color unstable. Color bounces off the wall, sullying the edges of the neighboring canvases, while use unevenly and unpredictably fades the spots’ intensity. As one moves toward and along the work, one draws and redraws the canvases’ borders. Their shadows expand and retract uncontrollably on all sides. Viewers are left oscillating in a battleground between control and contingency. Ultimately, Color Vulture is a metaevent: a play on the rectangle in the third power. It also nods to Mondrian’s 1926 essay “Home-Street-City.”

One Thousand People Just like Me assaults a nearby wall with half-drilled-in screws, creating an immersive, if at times nearly imperceptible, grid. As one traverses the space, shadows variously thicken the screws/strokes, turning the work into a constellation of recombinant works-to-come. Across the room, Nuclear Error tenuously blankets a wall with twenty-five black thirty-gallon garbage bags, hung gridlike with static electricity and a few black pushpins. When push comes to shove, Deleget’s tight show proves the infinite power of deft gesture.

Sylvie Fortin is an independent curator, critic, and editor. She was Editor-in-Chief of ART PAPERS magazine from 2004-2012 and Curator of Contemporary Art at the Ottawa Art Gallery from 1996-2001.

Image:
Installation view of Matthew Deleget: Pictures at an Exhibition, 2012

posted November 10, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , ,

Interview with Gorky’s Granddaughter

Interview with Matthew Deleget
by Zachary Keeting & Christopher Joy
Gorky’s Granddaughter
November 3, 2012

posted November 04, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , ,

Matthew Deleget: Pictures at an Exhibition

Matthew Deleget, Pictures at an Exhibition<br> The Cress Gallery of Art, UTC Fine Arts Center, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Matthew Deleget
Pictures at an Exhibition
The Cress Gallery of Art
UTC Fine Arts Center
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
752 Vine Street
Chattanooga, TN 37403
October 9 – December 7, 2012
Lecture: Tuesday, October 9, 5:30 – 6:30pm, followed by an opening reception

The Diane Marek Visiting Artist Series, now in its 7th year at the University of Tennessee Chattanooga, announces its 2012-2013 season.

Chattanoogan and supporter of the arts, Diane Marek, began this Series with a vision of bringing visual artists of national reputation to Chattanooga for an intensive schedule of events over multiple days with community and students. The Series provides all an inclusive opportunity for informal, personal contact with the artist towards the goal of demystifying and enlarging perspective about contemporary investigation, practice, and expression in the visual arts. Scheduled activities encourage greater understanding of process and materials, studio and installation practice, the integration of historical trends and other academic disciplines, as well as insight into the life and work of a professional artist today. For UTC art majors, the Series contributes to the depth of their education and includes one-on-one engagement for both the upper and lower level student. The artists of Diane Marek Series also experience the vibrant culture of Chattanooga connecting with individuals across the city and campus.

In conjunction with all Diane Marek Artists’ visits, the UTC Cress Gallery of Art supported by The Friends of the Gallery organizes an exhibition of the artists’ work, a partnership that further sets this Series apart from any similar program at other institutions.

Matthew Deleget begins the Diane Marek Visiting Artist Series this fall with activities in Chattanooga and on the UTC campus October 8 – 11, 2012. Deleget will present a public lecture Tuesday, October 9, at 5:30 pm in the UTC Fine Arts Center followed by an informal reception.

Merging painting with conceptual, process, and installation strategies, Matthew Deleget’s reductive abstraction creates a rich sensory experience in response to the broad plurality of our contemporary world. In addition to his artistic practice, Deleget writes, curates, and advocates for the arts, and is co-founder of the gallery Minus Space, a platform for the international promotion of reductive art located in Brooklyn, NY. Matthew Deleget’s Cress exhibition titled “Pictures at an Exhibition” will open immediately after his October 9 lecture and run through December 7, 2012.

Gallery hours:
Monday – Friday, 9:30am – 7:30pm
Saturday and Sunday, 1:00pm – 4:00pm

Image:
Exhibition Announcement
Matthew Deleget, Color Vulture (detail), 2012
3 off-the-shelf white canvases, red, yellow, and blue spotlights
Dimensions variable, canvases 24 x 20 inches each

posted September 20, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , ,

ArtObama

artobama-500-pixels

ArtObama
382 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
October 3, 2012, 7:00-9:30pm (bidding from 7:00-8:30pm)
www.artobama.org

Join us for an auction of exception works by more than 100 American artists who support the re-election of President Barack Obama. View the work and pre-register (strongly recommended) at www.artobama.org . Proxy bids accepted through October 2, 8pm. To make a proxy bid, call 718.781.0354.

$45 at pre-registration or at the door. All proceeds benefit the Obama Victory Fund 2012 and ActBlue, a PAC supporting progressive House and Senate candidates nationwide.

posted September 19, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: ,

Three Summer MFA Shows Tackle Painting and Its Discontents

Matthew Deleget, They Don’t Love You Like I Love You, 2009, Silver monochromes, silver acrylic paint on 4 panels, hit with a hammer, 16 x 60 inches overall, each panel 16 x 12 inches

Three Summer MFA Shows Tackle Painting and Its Discontents
by Allison Meier
Hyperallergic
July 26, 2012

“Three current exhibits focusing on recent MFA recipients show that painting is still being utilized by young artists for experimentation, even if they have to totally destroy the canvas with a hammer or fill it with cement…Then there is Matthew Deleget’s frenzied “They Don’t Love You Like I Love You” (2009), where four panels painted with silver were totally smashed by the artist, leaving jagged holes to the empty wall, showing that voids of paintings, at least when they are attacked in such an agressive way, can have just as much emotion as those without blunt force trauma…Art Peña, similar to Matthew Deleget in the Pratt show, has destroyed the place for the paint within the frame, here with a cake of cement in “Attempt 17″ (2012), a statement on artistic trial and error instead of Deleget’s angry love.”

Image:
Matthew Deleget
They Don’t Love You Like I Love You, 2009
Silver monochromes, silver acrylic paint on 4 panels, hit with a hammer
16 x 60 inches overall, each panel 16 x 12 inches

posted July 30, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: , ,

Notations: The Cage Effect Today at Hunter College Times Square Gallery

Matthew Deleget, Notations: The Cage Effect Today, Hunter College Times Square Gallery, New York, 2012

Notations: The Cage Effect Today at Hunter College Times Square Gallery
by Eva Diaz
Artforum
Summer 2012

“…Between this circuit of silences pregnant with sound and emptiness full of incident, the artists in “Notations” continually return to Cage by way of Rauschenberg. The exhibition’s spare, refined installation rewarded sharp attention and patience, as many works would be overlooked in nearly any other context. Matthew Deleget’s Monochrome (Sleeper Cells), 2007, consists of three reflective panels coated nearly to their edges with white paint the same color as the gallery walls. Such a work might elicit a shrug elsewhere (as no doubt many monochromes sometimes to), but the discursive field of “Cage/Rauschenberg” demands subtler perception. Deleget’s paintings amplify shadows, and their color and appearance vary according to light conditions. Additionally the roughly applied perimeter of paint appears like the slapdash coats thrown up to cover graffiti on city walls…”

Image:
Installation view of Notations: The Cage Effect Today, Hunter College Times Square Gallery, New York, NY, 2012
Left: Matthew Deleget, Right: Linda Stillman

posted June 08, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , ,

Pratt Alumi Painters

Matthew Deleget, They Don’t Love You Like I Love You, 2009, Silver monochromes, silver acrylic paint on 4 panels, hit with a hammer, 16 x 60 inches overall, each panel 16 x 12 inches

Pratt Alumni Painters
Curated by Nick Battis, Director of Exhibitions
Pratt Manhattan Gallery
144 W. 14th Street, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10011
June 7 – July 28, 2012
Opening: Thursday, June 7, 7-9pm

Participating Artists:
Derrick Adams, Polina Barskaya, Trudy Benson, Matthew Deleget, Elaine Komorowski, Il Lee, Carrie Moyer, Lisa Sanditz, Kris Scheifele, Marc Van Cauwenbergh, Andrew Sendor, Russell Tyler, Takashi Usui, Blade Wynne

The work of Pratt Alumni has been displayed at many prominent museums, including The Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Brooklyn Museum, as well as at museums and galleries internationally. This installment of the alumni exhibition series focuses on a small group of painters who graduated within the last three decades.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
They Don’t Love You Like I Love You, 2009
Silver monochromes, silver acrylic paint on 4 panels, hit with a hammer
16 x 60 inches overall, each panel 16 x 12 inches

posted April 27, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fashion156 Feature

Matthew Deleget

Daily Blog Feature
Fashion156
Number 1
24 Old Royal Free Square
Liverpool Road
Islington
London
N1 0YH
England

Image:
Matthew Deleget
No If’s, No But’s, No Maybe’s, 2007
Three monochrome paintings (acrylic on panel), hit with a hammer
24 x 68 inches overall (24 x 18 inches each)
Private collection

posted March 02, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: ,

Book Launch

Dr. Julius | AP, FutureShock OneTwo

Book Launch: FutureShock OneTwo: Internationale Neue Konkrete +
dr. julius | ap
Leberstrasse 60
10829 Berlin, Germany
Sunday, February 26, 2012, 3pm

The exhibition FutureShock OneTwo showcases two components: first, current trends in the advancement of the New Concrete and non-objective art; and second the potential of the philosophy behind this art to impact society. 31 participants from 10 countries and three continents each display a work of theirs that they feel looks ahead towards the future.

In the catalogue the works exhibited and statements of the artists themselves or texts from other authors chosen by the artists are included.

Editor: Matthias Seidel
Essay: Gunnar Klack

Artists: Hartmut Böhm [DE, Text Gregory Volk]; Ray Malone [GB]; Henriëtte van’t Hoog [NL]; Josef Linschinger [AT, Heidi Bierwisch]; Don Voisine [US]; Edgar Diehl [DE]; José Heerkens [NL]; Wolfgang Berndt [DE]; Burchard Vossmann [DE]; Riki Mijling [NL, Antoon Melissen]; David Rhodes [GB]; Gilbert Hsiao [US]; Daniel Göttin [CH]; Monika Brandmeier [DE]; Sabine Laidig [DE, Sibylle Badstübner-Gröger]; Anette Haas [DE, Thomas Brasch]; John Aslanidis [AU]; Wolfram Ullrich [DE, Ralf Christofori]; Károly Keserü [HU, Patrick Heide]; Jan Maarten Voskuil [NL]; Stephan Ehrenhofer [AT]; Carles Valverde [ES, Kim Behm]; Marco Grassi [IT]; Pierre Juillerat [CH, Matthias Bleyl]; Siegfried Kreitner [DE]; Guido Winkler [NL]; Michael Graeve [AU]; Giles Ryder [AU]; Matthew Deleget [US]; Maik Teriete [DE, Jan Künemund]; Tim Stapel [DE, jfk]

German/English, 80 pages, 36 images, 23 x 30.2 cm, brochure
ISBN 978-3-939855-28-6
SURFACE Book, Darmstadt, www.surface-book.de
dr. julius | ap [edition ROTE INSEL 00012]

posted February 22, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Notations: The Cage Effect Today

Notations: The Cage Effect Today, Hunter College / Times Square Galleries, New York, NY

Notations: The Cage Effect Today
Curated by Joachim Pissarro, Bibi Calderaro & Julio Grinblatt
Hunter College / Times Square Gallery
450 West 41st Street
New York, NY
February 17 – April 21, 2012
Opening: February 16, 6-8pm

Participating Artists:
William Anastasi, Soledad Arias, Celeste Boursier-Mougenot, Waltercio Caldas, Jose Damasceno, Hanne Darboven, Matthew Deleget, Liz Deschenes, Felipe Dulzaides, Leon Ferrari, Robert Filliou, Yukio Fujimoto, Nicolas Guagnini, Lynne Harlow, Douglas Huebler, Gareth James, David Lamelas, Reiner Leist, Jorge Macchi, Christian Marclay, Rivane Neuenschwander, Kaz Oshiro, Edgardo Rudnitzky, Fred Sandback, Frank Scheffer, Ushio Shinohara, Linda Stillman, Daniel Wurtzel

posted February 04, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

FutureShock OneTwo

Matthew Deleget, Shuffle (for Jose "Cheo" Feliciano), 2010, Acrylic, fluorescent and metallic acrylic on MDF, 18 x 18 inches / 46 x 46 cm

FutureShock OneTwo
dr. julius | ap
Leberstrasse 60
D-10829 Berlin
Germany
www.dr-julius.de
January 26 – March 17, 2012
Opening: Thursday, January 26, 7 pm
Hours: Thursday–Saturday, 3–7 pm & by appointment

For the first exhibition in 2012 dr julius | ap will present FutureShock OneTwo, a group show featuring a selection of international artists from three continents.

The exhibition will showcase two components: first, current trends in the advancement of non-objective art; and second the potential of the philosophy behind this art to impact society. Participants will each display a work of theirs that they feel looks ahead towards the future. An important goal of this exhibition is to have the artists join a general discussion on the future of non-objective art, such as its potential to influence one‘s perspective on life, especially in comparison with narrative forms of art. Moreover, it is to explore the relation of art and value: in times of a fundamental crisis in the monetary system, can money really be the adequate equivalent in which to trade art? Is the work of the artist actually not more than money can ever be?

The exhibition will run from January 26 through March 17, 2012 and show works by the following artists:

John Aslandis [AUS]
Wolfgang Berndt [DE]
Hartmut Böhm [DE]
Monika Brandmeier [DE]
Matthew Deleget [US]
Edgar Diehl [DE]
Stephan Ehrenhofer [AT]
Daniel Göttin [CH]
Michael Graeve [AUS]
Marco Grassi [IT]
Anette Haas [DE]
José Heerkens [NL]
Gilbert Hsiao [US]
Pierre Juillerat [CH]
Károly Keserü [HU]
Siegfried Kreitner [DE]
Sabine Laidig [DE]
Josef Linschinger [AT]
Ray Malone [GB]
Riki Mijling [NL]
David Rhodes [GB]
Giles Ryder [AUS]
Tim Stapel [DE]
Maik Teriete [DE]
Wolfram Ullrich [DE]
Carles Valverde [ES]
Henriëtte van’t Hoog [NL]
Don Voisine [US]
Jan Maarten Voskuil [NL]
Burchard Vossmann [DE]
Guido Winkler [NL]

A catalogue for this exhibition will be published at Suface books, Darmstadt. It will be presented to the public on February 26, 2012 at the gallery.

Image:
Matthew Deleget, Shuffle (for Jose “Cheo” Feliciano), 2010
Acrylic, fluorescent and metallic acrylic on MDF
18 x 18 inches / 46 x 46 cm

posted January 03, 2012 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Abstraction to the Power of Infinity

icebox-aaa-400

Abstraction to the Power of Infinity
American Abstract Artists
The Icebox / Crane Fine Arts
1400 N. American Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
www.cranearts.com
www.americanabstractartists.org
November 3 – 27, 2011
Opening: Thursday, November 10, 6-9pm

American Abstract Artists presents Abstraction to the Power of Infinity, curated by Janet Kurnatowski. ABSTRACTION celebrates the perseverance of non-figurative and non-objective art, including the practitioners, pioneers and those currently working in the traditions of abstraction. This exhibition shows the recent work of 76 members of the American Abstract Artists (AAA), along with four guest exhibitors. The works exhibited span a variety of media including painting, sculpture, photography, installation, video, and digital computer art; vividly communicating with color, line, form and texture.

As one of the few artists’ organizations born of the Great Depression, the AAA was a pivotal force in the development and acceptance of abstract art in the US. The group’s continued vitality after 75 years is a testament to the power and reach of these non-objective art forms and points to an infinite future for abstraction…This exhibition is also a tribute to Will Barnet, an esteemed member of the AAA since 1954 and also the AAA’s first centenarian.

The artists included in the exhibition are:
Alice Adams, Steven Alexander, Eve Aschheim, Martin Ball, Will Barnet, Dennis Beach, Siri Berg, Emily Berger, Power Boothe, Susan Bonfils, Sharon Brant, Henry Brown, Marvin Brown, Kenneth Bushnell, James O. Clark, Mark Dagley, Matthew Deleget, Tom Doyle, Tom Evans, Gabriele Evertz, Kevin Finklea, Heidi Glück, Vito Giacalone, John Goodyear, Gail Gregg, James Gross, Lynne Harlow, Mara Held, Daniel G. Hill, Charles Hinman, Gilbert Hsiao, Phillis Ideal, Julian Jackson, Roger Jorgensen, James Juszczyk, Cecily Kahn, Steve Karlik, Marthe Keller, Victor Kord, Irene Lawrence, Mon Levinson, James Little, Jane Logemann, Vincent Longo, Katinka Mann, Nancy Manter, Stephen Maine, Rossana Martinez, David MacKenzie, Creighton Michael, Manfred Mohr, Judith Murray, Sharyn O’Mara, John Phillips, Corey Postiglione, Joan Webster Price, Raquel Rabinovich, Leo Rabkin, Ce Roser, Irene Rousseau, David Row, James Seawright, Edward Shalala, Babe Shapiro, Louis Silverstein, Robert Storr, Peter Stroud, Robert Swain, Richard Timperio, Clover Vail, Vera Vasek, Don Voisine, Merrill Wagner, Joan Waltemath, Stephen Westfall, Mark Williams, Jeanne Wilkinson, Thornton Willis, Kes Zapkus, Nola Zirin

Exhibition curator Janet Kurnatowsk is the owner and director of Janet Kurnatowski Gallery in Brooklyn, NY. Since opening its doors in 2004, the gallery has maintained a strong focus on showing abstract art from emerging talent as well as mid-career and established artists. Special thanks to The Golden Rule Foundation for making this exhibition possible.

Image:
Thornton Willis (left), Matthew Deleget (right)
Photo: Steven Alexander

posted November 03, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Gifting Abstraction

giftingabstractioninvite

Gifting Abstraction
Curated by Mariángeles Soto-Díaz
SOHO20 Gallery
New York, NY
www.soho20gallery.com
October 4–29, 2011

Featuring works by Melanie Crader, Matthew Deleget, Anoka Faruqee, Michelle Grabner, Brent Hallard, John Hawke, Gilbert Hsiao, Pablo Manga, Thomas Martin, Leah Raintree, Claudia Sbrissa, Karen Schifano, Karen Schiff, Jessica Snow, Mariángeles Soto-Díaz, Robert Strati, Ann Tarantino

Gifting Abstraction establishes an intimate economy within Soho20Chelsea gallery in which abstract objects have not yet turned into objectified commodities. The gift economy paradigm recognizes that there is value outside market forces, and that the gift renders forces and riches of its own. One of the perplexing aspects of the gift is that while its effect cannot be quantified, its intention is generally palpable: at its best, the gift generates a sense of interconnectedness. In this exhibition, artists’ labor stretches beyond the works themselves, as connective lines are symbolically rendered through the gifting process onto a relational dimension.

Gifting Abstraction questions the idea that abstract works are inextricably bound to the marketplace and therefore to a larger discourse of individualism. Abstraction has been construed as standing in direct opposition to the “relational aesthetics” theorized by Nicolas Bourriaud: “It seems more pressing to invent possible relations with our neighbors in the present than to bet on happier tomorrows.” Bourriaud implicitly pits object-based art practices such as abstract painting – which he associates with the notion of (failed) utopias – against what he calls “microtopia,” a provisional, DIY, relational approach to art.

This exhibition dismantles these oppositions, bringing abstract objects into a shifting and relational process. The arrangement of abstract art works in the exhibit will change regularly over 20 days based on choices by the participating artists. Each artist gifts a piece and selects one from the exhibition to take at the end of the show. There will be a diagram notating each selection, and artists can rearrange the works after they select their gift. Each artist communicates with the previous and subsequent “gifting” artists, and with the other artists of the show through a blog designed for that purpose, in an exhibit where the relationships among the artists are of primary importance. Also inspired by Umberto Eco’s poetics of the “open work,” this exhibition changes with each gift, creating a new communicative situation through the abstract works themselves.

Gifting Abstraction, curated by Mariángeles Soto-Díaz, is part of Abstraction at Work, a series dedicated to rethinking abstraction’s functions through projects ranging from installations to curatorial experiments.

posted October 04, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

arteBA Art Fair

avhg16-copy

Alejandra von Hartz Gallery
Booth 182
arteBA Art Fair
Buenos Aires, Argentina
May 19-23, 2011

posted May 17, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , ,

75th Anniversary: American Abstract Artists International

Matthew Deleget, Galerie oqbo

75th Anniversary: American Abstract Artists International
Deutscher Künstlerbund Projektraum & Galerie oqbo
Berlin, Germany
May 14 – June 18, 2011
Opening: Friday, May 13, 2011, 7:00 pm

The two-part exhibition, that will take place in both the Galerie oqbo and in the Projektraum at the Deutsche Künstlerbund, will present works from 75 American and German artists, and will offer an overview of different contemporary manifestations of abstract art. The works of the American Abstract Artists will be complemented by a selection of ten works each by the Galerie oqbo (from the Paperfile collection) and the Deutsche Künsterlbund.

Participating Artists:
Degenhard Andrulat, Kirstin Arndt, Martin Ball, Michael Bause, Siri Berg, Emily Berger, Christian Bilger, Susan Bonfils, Sharon Brant, Henry Brown, James O. Clark, Mark Dagley, Matthew Deleget, Ruth Eckstein, Frank Eltner, Gabriele Evertz, Andreas Exner, James Geccelli, Heidi Gluck, Thomas Grochowiak, James Gross, Lynne Harlow, Mara Held, Daniel G. Hill, Gilbert Hsiao, Ben Hübsch, Phillis Ideal, Julian Jackson, Michael Jäger, Susanne Jung, James Juszczyk, Cecily Kahn, Steve Karlik, Marthe Keller, Victor Kord, Irene Lawrence, Dirk Lebahn, Seraphina Lenz, Mon Levinson, Jane Logemann, Vincent Longo, David MacKenzie, Stephen Maine, Katinka Mann, Nancy Manter, Bertold Mathes, Rossana Martinez, Creighton Michael, Klaus Merkel, Manfred Mohr, Maria Morganti, Judith Murray, John Phillips, Lucio Pozzi, Leo Rabkin, David Rhodes, Ce Roser, Irene Rousseau, David Row, Jo Schöpfer, Edward Shalala, Anita Stöhr Weber, Richard Timperio, Clover Vail, Don Voisine, Merrill Wagner, Stephen Westfall, Jeanne Wilkinson, Mark Williams, Thornton Willis, Renate Wolff, Kes Zapkus, Julia Ziegler, Nola Zirin, David Reed

Our purpose is to unite abstract artists residing in the United States, to bring before the public their individual works, and in every possible way foster public appreciation for this direction in painting and sculpture. We believe that a new art form has been established which is definite enough in character to demand this united effort. (From the preface to the 1938 catalogue of the American Abstract Artists’ second annual exhibition)

It was 1936, and the country was in the middle of the Great Depression. Though most public presentations of art were conservative, capturing the subdued tone of a nation under economic siege, the Museum of Modern Art mounted the first exhibition of cubist and abstract art—but neglected American artists working in this vein. Angry, many of these artists formed a support network, led by Carl Holty, Harry Holtzman, and George L. K. Morris, and they began to meet informally at the studio of Ibram Lassaw, discussing ways to change the perception of their work and to bring more attention to their ideas and ideals. One can imagine the energy, the vibrant talk, the vigorous camaraderie that developed during these evenings. And in 1937, this informal group exhibited together for the first time at the Squibb Gallery on 57th Street as the American Abstract Artists.

These were heady days, and the success of their first exhibition led to a growth in membership, more exhibitions, lectures, and catalogues. Many years later, one of the original members, Esphyr Slobodkina, remembered, “Critical opinion was about equally divided between scathing denunciations and benign curiosity.” Not discouraged, the group thrived though the critics remained hostile, culminating in 1940 when the group formed a picket line in front of the Museum of Modern Art, protesting the lack of recognition and respect by such institutions.

During World War II, European artists Piet Mondrian, Fernand Lèger, and László Moholy-Nagy emigrated to America and found a sympathetic community among the members of the AAA. Mondrian became a member of the group and was something of a spiritual mentor to many of them, along with Hans Hofmann, who never joined, but whose inspirational teaching spawned a new generation of like-minded artists. In the 1950s, the more robust abstraction of Mondrian was replaced by a quiet stillness, particularly evident in the work and writings of artists like Ad Reinhardt and Burgoyne Diller. While abstraction seemed to be moving in new directions, the longevity of the group itself can be attributed to its lack of dogma, rejection of any party line or adherence to any manifestoes, and a general open enthusiasm for abstract art in all its variations.

Despite changes within the membership as well as in the art world, the AAA has continued strong for seventy-five years, a testament to the nurture and care of these artists who strongly believe that the abstract impulse can happily encompass diverse approaches and identities, from the dynamic structural symmetry of Mondrian, to a biomorphic, surrealist-inspired abstraction, to the rigid, grid-like forms of neoplasticism. This exhibition celebrates this achievement.”

Text by Nancy E. Green, curator of Splendor of Dynamic Structure: Celebrating 75 Years of the American Abstract Artists, January 22–March 20, 2011, at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University.

Image:
American Abstract Artists’ First Exhibition
Squibb Gallery, NYC, 1937

posted April 28, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Variety Trumps Argument at the Bronx River Art Center

Matthew Deleget, The Working Title, Bronx River Art Center, Bronx, NY

Variety Trumps Argument at the Bronx River Art Center
By Stephen Maine
artcritical
April 23, 2011

“…Matthew Deleget’s work resides toward the other end of abstraction’s spectrum as the realization, on a painted surface, of a preconceived procedural idea. The colors in Shuffle (for Grandmaster Flash) (2011) are selected at random—yellow, pink, fluorescent orange and copper predominate—and arranged by means of a predetermined system of recombination within a four-by-four unit grid. Abstraction as perceptual research, Shuffle is an extreme instance of the empirical attitude that underlies much of the work in the show, which is alert to pictorial strategies rather than intent on fetishizing subjectivities…”

Image:
Installation view with works by Cordy Ryman, Matthew Deleget, EJ Hauser, Jered Sprecher, Tisch Abelow (l to r)

posted April 24, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , ,

The Working Title at the Bronx River Art Center

brac-the-working-title-400

The Working Title at the Bronx River Art Center
By Andrew Russeth
16 Miles of String blog
April 7, 2011

“…A small square by Matt Deleget — titled Shuffle (for Grandmaster Flash), a tribute to the hip-hop legend who grew up in the surrounding community — contains far more punch than one would expect from a painting just 18 inches on each side. Filled with bright squares of pink, yellow, and orange, it holds up well against its sprightly neighbor, a Cordy Ryman put together with just a few wood blocks.

It’s a strange thing be in the neighborhood of Grandmaster Flash, just a few blocks from the late and legendary Fashion Moda, looking at contemporary art by artists whose work one usually sees in Chelsea, on the Lower East Side, or out in Brooklyn. Strange, but nice, with friends and acquaintances brought together en masse in a new context…”

Image (left to right):
Cordy Ryman, Vector, 2010
Enamel, shellac and epoxy on wood
36.25 x 33.5 inches

Matthew Deleget, Shuffle (for Grandmaster Flash), 2011
Acrylic, fluorescent and metallic acrylic on MDF
18 x 18 inches

posted April 09, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , ,

Pared

Matthew Deleget, I Love You, 2007, Used plastic shopping bags in 9 colors mounted on 9 panels, Dimensions variable" title="Matthew Deleget, I Love You, 2007, Used plastic shopping bags in 9 colors mounted on 9 panels, Dimensions variable

Pared: Matthew Deleget and Ellen Nagel
U·turn Art Space
2159 Central Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45214
u.turn.artspace@gmail.com
April 2-30, 2011
Opening: Saturday, April 2, 7-10pm

For Pared, U·turn Art Space presents works by Matthew Deleget and Ellen Nagel that consider reduction as a maneuver in painting, sculpture throughout art history. Deleget presents a series of monochrome works on panel, along with a long-term and ongoing conceptual project based in the collection of artist catalogues that have been purchased at deeply discounted prices. Nagel has created a number of brand new sculptural installations for the exhibition. Together, Deleget’s and Nagel’s work continues a line of inquiry into reduction and restraint in which U·turn is persistently invested.

Deleget’s I Love You (2007) is comprised of solidly colored plastic shopping bags that have been mounted onto nine panels. I Love You was inspired by The Beatles song All Together Now (also, a humorous reference to collaboration). In the song, Paul McCartney sings the lines, “black, white, green, red — can I take my friend to bed? — pink, brown, yellow, orange, blue — I love you.” Deleget has quoted McCartney directly, with each of the nine panels corresponding to the mentioned colors and installed in the order found in the song. Deleget uses McCartney’s lyrics to connect his practice of abstraction to unexpected cultural points of reference.

Deleget also presents a collection of books as art objects. All of the books are about living abstract artists—his inspirations—and were purchased at major art museums in New York City at heavily discounted prices. While his works on panel bespeak to Deleget’s own love and commitment to abstract art, this project questions whether the artists and their ideas have been discounted with the prices of these books.

Ellen Nagel’s assemblage sculptures are experiments in elegant restraint. Nagel creates art experiences that occupy the same space as the viewer, at approximately the same scale of the viewer. The avatars she constructs bring together found objects from home life (clothing, shopping bags), the studio (paint, drawing boards) and the cleanly institutional (modular office furniture). While there may be any number of elements in each work, their overall effect is one of absolute subtlety. As freestanding, collaged objects, they call attention to their own physical features: rigidity and slackness, buoyancy and gravity, tension and repose. She balances seemingly incidental elements with formalist choices that are precise and considered. Around their edges, her works evoke myth and metaphor as monuments to the humble and the heroic. Ultimately, they evidence the culture(s) surrounding their making.

Artist Bios
Matthew Deleget is an abstract painter, curator, and writer. He has exhibited his work nationally and internationally, including solo and group exhibitions in Europe, Asia, and Australia. He is a member of American Abstract Artists, the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation’s Artist Advisory Committee, and the board of The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts. Matthew has received awards from the American Academy of Arts & Letters, Brooklyn Arts Council, and The Golden Rule Foundation, and his work has been reviewed in The New York Times, Flash Art, Artnet Magazine, The Philadelphia Inquirer, and Basler Zeitung, among others.

In 2003, Deleget founded MINUS SPACE (www.minusspace.com), a platform for reductive art on the international level based in Brooklyn, NY. MINUS SPACE’s web site is used by more than 800 people daily from 150 countries worldwide. Deleget has also organized more than two dozen solo and group exhibitions at both MINUS SPACE’s gallery in the Gowanus, Brooklyn, as well as other collaborating venues on the national and international levels. MINUS SPACE exhibitions have been reviewed in Art in America, Artnet Magazine, ArtNews, The Brooklyn Rail, Houston Public Radio, Huffington Post, The New Criterion, New York Magazine, NYFA Current, New York Sun, Time Out New York, and Village Voice, among others.

Deleget holds an MFA in Painting and an MS in Theory, Criticism and History of Art, Design and Architecture from Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY. He holds a BA in Art and German from Wabash College, Crawfordsville, IN. He lives with his wife, artist Rossana Martinez, and son in Brooklyn, NY.

Ellen Nagel is a Cincinnati native, where she continues to live and work. She received a BFA from the Art Academy of Cincinnati in 2010. Nagel appeared in U·turn Art Space’s first exhibition Brought To You By, and the gallery collective immediately sought a reprisal of Nagel’s work in a more ambitious installation. Nagel has previous participated in multiple exhibitions at the Art Academy’s Chidlaw Gallery. In 2010, she was one of several artists to create a site-specific installation in the Cincinnati Art Museum. Entitled Let Fall, the interactive work invited viewers to look behind heavy black curtains to experience a series of post-minimal painted shapes.

U·turn Art Space
U·turn Art Space is a collective-run alternative arts space that was initiated in fall 2009. The U·turn Art Space collective is comprised of five Cincinnati-based artists: Molly Donnermeyer, Matt Morris, Patricia Murphy, Zach Rawe and Eric Ruschman. With special interests in installation art and conceptual art practices, U·turn nonetheless exhibits artists with diverse aesthetics that are based in the Cincinnati region, as well as across the world, including (to date) Berlin, Germany; Chicago, IL; London, England; Miami, FL; New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; and San Diego, CA. Its goal is to bring shows into Cincinnati that are relevant; that provide an opportunity for discourse, ideas, and play to be forced together, awkwardly or elegantly, and offer itself to a viewing audience. Along with art exhibitions, U·turn hosts a range of accompanying readings, performances and events that raise probing questions and plural perspectives. U·turn’s efforts are intended for audiences in the surrounding Brighton district, Cincinnati at large and the whole of the Midwest.

Regular gallery hours are on Saturdays, 12-4 pm, and by appointment.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
I Love You, 2007
Used plastic shopping bags in 9 colors mounted on 9 panels
Dimensions variable

posted March 30, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

The Working Title

Matthew Deleget, The Working Title, Organized by Progress Report, Bronx River Art Center

The Working Title
Curated by Progress Report
Bronx River Art Center
305 East 140th Street, #1A
Bronx, NY 10454
www.bronxriverart.org
March 25 – April 29, 2011
Opens: Friday, March 25, 6-9pm

A 32-artist group survey of recent abstraction organized by Progress Report.

Participating Artists: Amy Feldman, Benjamin King, Britton Tolliver, Cordy Ryman, Dennis Hollingsworth, Douglas Melini, EJ Hauser, Eric Freeman, Gary Petersen, Halsey Hathaway, Ian Pedigo, Inna Babaeva, Ivin Ballen, Jasmine Justice, JD Walsh, Jered Sprecher, Joshua Abelow, Joy Curtis, Keltie Ferris, Kris Chatterson, Lauren Luloff, Letha Wilson, Matthew Deleget, Omar Chacon, Osamu Kobayashi, Pamela Jorden, Patrick Brennan, Stacy Fisher, Tamara Zahaykevich, Tisch Abelow, Vince Contarino, Yadir Quintana

The name of the exhibition refers to the changing classification, description, or title that is given to abstraction. By nature, abstraction resists tradition and categorization transforming itself into a highly visual moving target. These artists employ abstraction as a means to investigate different approaches to materials, systems, media and content. Rather than following a pre-established doctrine of romantic sentimentality, most of the works elicit an air of experimentation, familiarity, and an overall sense of purpose.

The Working Title brings together different perspectives on abstraction in conversation with each other. Minimalism, post-modern, geometric, gestural, formal, color filed, video and process-driven works occupying the same room, creating unpredictable relationships through contrasting approaches.

Having direct access to technology has become an important tool for artists to share and discuss their practice, making connections on a regional and global level. The collective stance and attitudes on making art are less defensive than they used to be, opening up conversations with the past by seeking out and elaborating on previous approaches that may have been marginalized or forgotten.

The Working Title is less about seizing the moment, but more of a selection of current voices that use abstraction as a starting point to create work that expands the trajectory of what is possible.

This exhibition was organized by Progress Report, a visually-driven project that offers a glimpse of the creative process that share various perspectives from the working artist’s point of view.

posted March 14, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Lost Painters Feature

lostpainters-400

Matthew Deleget
Lost Painters Blog
By Niek
March 12, 2011

| Comments (0)| Tags:

Index

index-magazine-4001

Index
Issue No. 1, September 2010
Melbourne, Australia
ISSN 1838-501X
Edition of 50

Participating Artists:
Justin Andrews, Andrew Barber, Stephen Bram, Lars Breuer, Sanne Bruggink, Christoph Dahlhausen, Matthew Deleget, Craig Easton, Anna Finlayson, Sebastian Freytag, Daniel Gottin, Jasper van der Graaf, Melinda Harper, Bianca Hester, Matt Hinkley, Clemens Hollerer, Kyle Jenkins, Gerard Kodde, Anne-Marie May, Guido Munch, John Nixon, Rose Nolan, Jan van der Ploeg, Kerrie Poliness, Sandra Selig, Gemma Smith, Masato Takasaka, David Thomas, Tilman, Peter Tyndall, Jan Maarten Voskuil, Thomas Wildner, Constanze Zikos

Image:
Publication cover

posted March 11, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Trendland Feature

Matthew Deleget, Trendland, March 3, 2011

Matthew Deleget
Reductive Abstraction Art
By Cyril Foiret
Trendland
March 3, 2011

posted March 04, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: ,

A Slice of Splendor: Johnson Museum Showcases American Abstract Artists

Matthew Deleget, War Monochromes, 2011, Fluorescent orange spray paint on canvases and wall, Dimensions variable; Installation view at Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

A Slice of Splendor: Johnson Museum Showcases American Abstract Artists
by Wylie Schwartz
Ithaca Times
February 16, 2011

“…The spirit of the avant-garde, under which American abstract art came to exist, continues to manifest itself in much of the recent work on display. In Matthew Deleget’s War Monochromes (2007-11), six squares painted with fluorescent orange spray paint suggest the abstract potential for graffiti art; the radiant color spills off the canvas and onto the wall, evoking a recent trend in street art where abstract interventions rather than empirical messages or text open up exciting new realms of possibility…”

Image:
Matthew Deleget
War Monochromes, 2011
Fluorescent orange spray paint on canvases and wall
Dimensions variable

posted February 16, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: ,

Back to Basics: 1st International Festival of Non-Objective Art

picture-1

Back to Basics
1st International Festival of Non-Objective Art
Organized by Roland Orépük
Moulins de Villancourt
83 Cours Saint-Andre
38800 Pont de Claix
France
www.pontdeclaix.fr
February 14 – April 5, 2011
Opening: Tuesday, February 15, 6:30pm

Participating Artists:
Pam Aitken, Christoph Dahlhausen, Caroline de Lannoy, Matthew Deleget, Daniel Gottin, Billy Gruner, Brent Hallard, Clemens Hollerer, Andrew Huston, Sarah Keighery, Roland Orepuk, Charles Payan, Jacek Przybyszewski, Paul Raguenes, Giles Ryder, Sato Satoru, Karen Schifano, Bogumila Strojna, Tilman, Richard van der Aa, Jan van der Ploeg, Henriette van ‘t Hoog, Guido Winkler

posted February 14, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Colour Light Time

Installation of Colour Light Time, Curated by David Thomas, Nellie Castan Gallery, Melbourne, Australia, 2011

Colour Light Time
Curated by David Thomas
Nellie Castan Gallery
12 River Street
South Yarra, Melbourne, 3141
Australia
www.nelliecastangallery.com
February 3-26, 2011
Opening: Thursday, February 3, 6-8pm

This project exhibits works by established international artists alongside works of a newer generation, including Joachim Bandau (GER), Lisa Benson (NZ), Christoph Dahlhausen (GER), Matthew Deleget (USA), Noel Ivanoff (NZ), Laresa Kosloff (AUS), William Mackrell (UK), Simon Morris (NZ), David Sequeira (AUS), David Thomas (AUS).

Image:
Installation view at Nellie Castan Gallery, Melbourne, Australia, 2011

posted February 03, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Splendor of Dynamic Structure

Matthew Deleget, War Monochromes, 2011, Fluorescent orange spray paint on canvases and wall, Dimensions variable, Installation view at Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Splendor of Dynamic Structure
Celebrating 75 Years of the American Abstract Artists
Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853
www.museum.cornell.edu
January 22 – March 20, 2011

The American Abstract Artists, formed in 1936, were drawn to Mondrian’s ideal of the “splendor of dynamic structure.” Despite many changes since then, the AAA has continued strong for seventy-five years, a testament to their belief that the abstract impulse can encompass diverse approaches and identities, influenced by surrealism, expressionism, and landscape painting. The historical portion of this exhibition is culled from the Johnson Museum’s permanent collection, supplemented by a curated selection of works chosen from among the current members of the AAA. The exhibition and catalogue were supported by the Wolf Kahn and Emily Mason Foundation and the Cornell Council for the Arts.

Image:
Installation view
Matthew Deleget
War Monochromes, 2011
Fluorescent orange spray paint on canvases and wall
Dimensions variable

posted January 22, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , ,

Alumni Exhibition

Matthew Deleget, No Man's Land, 2008, Cadmium red light acrylic on panel, hit with a hammer, 18 x 24 inches

Alumni Exhibition
Eric Dean Gallery
Randolph H. Deer Art Wing
Fine Arts Center
Wabash College
Crawfordsville, IN 47933
www.wabash.edu/academics/art
January 21 – February 18, 2011
Opening: Friday, January 21, 4:30-6pm

Image:
Matthew Deleget
No Man’s Land, 2008
Cadmium red light acrylic on panel, hit with a hammer
18 x 24 inches

posted January 21, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: ,

Miami International Art Fair & Panel Discussion

Alejandra von Hartz Gallery's both at Miami International Art Fair, Miami, FL, 2011

Miami International Art Fair
Alejandra von Hartz Gallery Booth
Miami Beach Convention Center, Hall D
1901 Convention Center Drive
Miami Beach, FL 33139
www.mia-artfair.com
January 13-17, 2011

PANEL DISCUSSION
Geometric Abstraction in the Contemporary World: Young Artsist, Robust Markets, Important Collections
Sunday, January 16, 2011, 2:45-3:45pm

Participants:
Alejandra von Hartz, Owner and Director of Alejandra von Hartz Gallery
Matthew Deleget, Artist and Director of MINUS SPACE
Gene Moreno, Moderator

Image:
Alejandra von Hartz Gallery’s booth, including Matthew Deleget, Shuffle Painting, 2010

posted January 13, 2011 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , ,

IKF’s Wonderfund Art Auction 2010

matthewdeleget-shuffleforceliacruz

International Kids Fund Wonderfund Art Auction 2010
Villa 221
221 NE 17th Street
Miami, FL 33132
www.wonderfund.org
Wednesday, December 8, 2010, 7-10pm

International Kids Fund (IKF) is a philanthropic program of Jackson Memorial Foundation committed to helping critically ill children primarily from Latin America and the Caribbean gain immediate access to essential medical treatments that are unavailable in their respective home countries.

Thanks to the program, hundreds of foreign children with urgent health care needs have received expert attention from medical specialists at Holtz Children’s Hospital, located at University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center in Miami, Florida, United States.

IKF successfully raises funds and administers proactive assistance by having an efficient organizational and financial infrastructure in place to quickly respond to specific requests for help. Simply stated, IKF is in the business of saving young people’s lives.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
Shuffle (for Celia Cruz), 2010
Acrylic and fluorescent acrylic on MDF
18 x 18 inches
Courtesy of the artist & Alejandra von Hartz Gallery, Miami

posted December 03, 2010 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , ,

Informal Relations

white-supremacist-composition1

Informal Relations: Contemporary Works on Paper
Curated by Scott Grow
Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art
1043 Virginia Avenue, Suite 5
Indianapolis, IN 46203
www.indymoca.org
December 3, 2010 – January 15, 2011
Opening: December 3, 6-11pm
Gallery Hours: Thursday–Saturday 11am – 6pm

Curator Scott Grow selects 32 artists from the United States, Germany, Spain and Japan to focus on the diversity of practices within painting and abstraction today.

The exhibition’s title refers to kind the “informal relations” artists have with one another, their predecessors, with the modernist tradition, the future, and even with their own work. While works on paper may stand as finished works, they are also often places for exploration, thinking, planning, taking chances, and failure. The show explores the challenges of abstract art. Since it typically refuses expected representation, language and absolute interpretation, it requires the viewer’s engagement and participation. Abstraction is not a singular school or style, the term itself is not necessarily helpful in identifying the qualities or concepts of the art object. Abstract artists often have shared and conflicting objectives for the art they make.

In response to these challenges with their genre of art, each artist in Informal Relations presents a definition of abstract painting. The exhibition explores the similarities, differences, and connections between these artists, their dialog with abstraction’s history, and various directions forward for abstraction.

Participating artists include: Patrick Alt, Chris Ashley, Patrick Berran, Kadar Brock, Matthew Deleget, Laura Fayer, Keltie Ferris, Patrick Michael Fitzgerald, Connie Goldman, Brent Hallard, Rachel Hayes, Jeffrey Cortland Jones, Michael Just, Matthew Langley, Jim Lee, Rossana Martinez, Rob Nadeau, Melissa Oresky, Paul Pagk, Danielle Riede, Maximilian Rödel, Eric Sall, Susan Scott, Gabriel J. Shuldiner, Jessica Snow, Henning Straßburger, Garth Weiser, Wendy White, Paige Williams, Douglas Witmer, Molly Zuckerman-Hartung and John Zurier.

Image:
Matthew Deleget
White Supremacist Composition, 2007
White monochrome, framed sheet of white foam stickers with Christian symbols
including crucifixes, Jesus fish, angels, hearts (readymade, purchased at Christian novelty store)
16 x 14 inches framed

posted December 01, 2010 | Comments (0)| Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Laundromat Project Benefit Auction

laundromat-auction

SOAPBOX II: Second Annual Art Auction
Collette Blanchard Gallery
26 Clinton Street
New York, NY 10002

October 27, 2010, 6-9 pm

An exciting evening including music with DJ Khary, drinks, hors d’oeuvres, and, most of all, art! Tickets start at $25.

posted October 19, 2010 | Comments (0)| Tags: , ,